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An Update on the Status of Hydatidosis/Echinococcosis in Domestic Animals, Wildlife and Humans in Australia

Part of the Parasitology Research Monographs book series (Parasitology Res. Monogr.,volume 13)

Abstract

Echinococcus granulosus is widespread in wildlife over much of Australia, especially in the eastern side of the country in areas associated with the Great Dividing Range. The predominant transmission pattern is sylvatic, with wildlife acting as a major conduit for infection in domestic livestock, especially cattle, but also sheep and domestic dogs and more rarely humans. Hydatid disease in cattle is the cause of important financial loss to the Australian beef industry, losses to the sheep meat industry are low. Conventional meat inspection methods detect less than one-third of bovine hepatic hydatidosis infections. Cases of infection in humans and domestic dogs are becoming less common. Transmission of hydatid disease to humans in the island state of Tasmania has ceased. Occasional cases of hydatid infection in Tasmanian cattle are seen, mostly in animals imported from the Australian mainland.

Keywords

  • Australia
  • Echinocuccus granulosus sensustricto
  • Livestock
  • Wildlife
  • Humans

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Fig. 7.1

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Jenkins, D.J. (2021). An Update on the Status of Hydatidosis/Echinococcosis in Domestic Animals, Wildlife and Humans in Australia. In: Strube, C., Mehlhorn, H. (eds) Dog Parasites Endangering Human Health. Parasitology Research Monographs, vol 13. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-53230-7_7

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