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Re-charge: Postcolonial Studies and Energy Humanities

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Abstract

What do postcolonial studies and energy humanities have to say to one another? Given that the former is by now a well-established field and the latter an emergent one, we might expect their relationship to be marked by wars of position and by anxieties of influence. This essay suggests that there is much to be gained from cross-fertilization and cross-hatching between the two. If postcolonial studies have been accused of evacuating the matter of history from its purview, energy humanities have suffered from insufficient attention to the dynamics of the empire. Not only can a conversation help correct these built-in perspectival lacunae of the two fields, but it can also help us understand how empire and energy are interconnected through a feedback loop.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Malm divides energy sources into three main types. “Flow” signifies those like wind and water that are solar in nature and can be directly collected or concentrated by prime movers. “Animate power” signifies the kind conditioned by metabolism embodied in living creatures. “Stock” refers to the kinds like coal, which are highly concentrated, cut off from weather fluctuations or metabolic demands, and require intricate chemical and technological processes to be converted to mechanical energy (Malm 2016, pp. 39–42).

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Correspondence to Upamanyu Pablo Mukherjee .

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Mukherjee, U.P. (2021). Re-charge: Postcolonial Studies and Energy Humanities. In: Kim, D.D. (eds) Reframing Postcolonial Studies. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-52726-6_6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-52726-6_6

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