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Autism and Sexual Crime

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Sexual Crime and Intellectual Functioning

Part of the book series: Sexual Crime ((SEXCR))

Abstract

This chapter begins by introducing autism, outlining the main diagnostic features and emphasising its highly heterogeneous nature. Potential links between autism and sexual crime are considered, with particular focus on how some features of autism can contribute to specific types of sexual crime. This chapter discusses the implications of, and challenges surrounding, autism in sexual offending rehabilitation, with specific references to adapted treatment pathways and group treatment formats. The chapter concludes with a summary of key points and recommendations, for practitioners working with autistic individuals who have sexual offence convictions, and a call for more research in this area.

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Correspondence to Gayle Dillon .

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Vinter, L.P., Dillon, G. (2020). Autism and Sexual Crime. In: Hocken, K., Lievesley, R., Winder, B., Swaby, H., Blagden, N., Banyard, P. (eds) Sexual Crime and Intellectual Functioning. Sexual Crime. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-52328-2_4

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