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Sexual Violence: How to Deal with It in Psychiatry

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Abstract

Sexual violence is a devastating but yet frequent concern for men, women, and children all over the world. Since most offenses are never reported to the police, the actual numbers of sexual offenses against children and adults can only be estimated. Therefore, it is not only necessary to help victims of sexual violence but also focus on prevention of sexual violence by treating offenders and those at risk to offend. Concerning the prevalence of sexual violence and its impact on victims, it would be negligent of society and the medical community to not try reaching potential/unconvicted perpetrators. The following chapter offers guidance for practitioners who want to have a more in-depth knowledge about the backgrounds of sexual violence and possibilities to work with potential or factual perpetrators. We illustrate the range of different motivations and clinical characteristics with case reports.

Keywords

  • Sexual violence
  • Sexual offending
  • Sexual offenders
  • Sexual offender treatment
  • Psychotherapy

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Gibbels, C., Kneer, J., Tenbergen, G., Krüger, T.H.C. (2021). Sexual Violence: How to Deal with It in Psychiatry. In: Lew-Starowicz, M., Giraldi, A., Krüger, T. (eds) Psychiatry and Sexual Medicine. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-52298-8_25

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-52298-8_25

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