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Positive Discipline Skills

Abstract

This chapter will begin with a review of the different functions of child misbehavior, reminding the reader that children continue to display challenging behavior even after learning new skills because it gets them what they want. Caregiver attention plays a powerful role in teaching children which behaviors are desired and those which are not. Therefore, Positive Discipline Skills will provide early intervention professionals with effective strategies for responding to children when they behave as well as when they resort to challenging behavior.

Keywords

  • Positive reinforcement
  • Discipline
  • Follow-through
  • Time out

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Fig. 7.1

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Teaching Compliance with Follow-Through

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Time Out for Noncompliance

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Agazzi, H., Shaffer-Hudkins, E.J., Armstrong, K.H., Hayford, H. (2020). Positive Discipline Skills. In: Promoting Positive Behavioral Outcomes for Infants and Toddlers. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-51614-7_7

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