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Executive-Legislative Relations: When Do Legislators Trust the President?

Part of the Latin American Societies book series (LAS)

Abstract

Research on interbranch conflict has mostly focused on the effect that the institutional and political context has on executive-legislative relations. Little attention has been paid to the interpersonal dimension in interbranch relations, despite being characterized by intensive interactions among political elites. Arguably, the trust that legislators have in the incumbent signals their willingness to negotiate and reach agreements with the head of government. In this chapter, we begin to address the factors that explain the trust legislators have in presidents. We use data from two unique databases, the Presidential Database of the Americas and the Parliamentary Elites of Latin America Project, to examine legislative trust in presidents from 18 countries for the 1994–2014 period. We find that factors that capture the institutional and political environment as well as variables that measure psychological and non-psychological characteristics of the leaders are relevant to understanding the trust that legislators have in heads of government.

Keywords

  • Executive-legislative relations
  • Parliamentary elites of Latin America project
  • Trust

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Correspondence to Carolina Guerrero Valencia .

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Arana Araya, I., Guerrero Valencia, C. (2020). Executive-Legislative Relations: When Do Legislators Trust the President?. In: Alcántara, M., García Montero, M., Rivas Pérez, C. (eds) Politics and Political Elites in Latin America. Latin American Societies. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-51584-3_7

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-51584-3_7

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