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Does Immersive VR Increase Learning Gain When Compared to a Non-immersive VR Learning Experience?

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNISA,volume 12206)

Abstract

Currently, computer assisted learning and multimedia form a key part of teaching. Interactivity and feedback are valuable in promoting active as opposed to passive learning. The study is conducted as an assessment of the impact of immersive VR on learning gain compared with a non-immersive video capture of VR, with a primary research question focusing on exploring learning gain and a secondary question exploring user experience, whereby understanding this is paramount to recognizing how to achieve a complete and effective learning experience. The study found immersive VR to significantly increase learning gain whilst two key measures of reported experience; enjoyment and concentration, also appeared significantly higher for the immersive VR learners. The study suggests extensive avenues for further research in this growing field, recognizing the need to appeal to a variety of students’ learning preferences. For educators, the relevance of self-directed and student-centered learning to enable active learning in the immersive tool is highlighted. Findings of such VR-based studies can be applied across several disciplines, including medical education; providing opportunity for users to learn without real-world consequences of error such as in surgical intervention.

Keywords

  • Virtual reality
  • Education
  • Medicine
  • Self-directed learning
  • Active learning

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Acknowledgements

The authors wish to acknowledge and thank the students who participated in the research experience. A special thanks to our supervisors Irene Kalkanis, Thomas Hurkxkens, Nitesh Bhatia and their colleagues in the Digital Learning Hub for their support and guidance throughout the project in addition to the Matar Fluid Group for their development of the learning tools used.

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Correspondence to Khadija Mahmoud , Isaac Harris , Husam Yassin or Irene Kalkanis .

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Mahmoud, K. et al. (2020). Does Immersive VR Increase Learning Gain When Compared to a Non-immersive VR Learning Experience?. In: Zaphiris, P., Ioannou, A. (eds) Learning and Collaboration Technologies. Human and Technology Ecosystems. HCII 2020. Lecture Notes in Computer Science(), vol 12206. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-50506-6_33

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