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Translation, Language and Culture

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Abstract

Unlike the other chapters, this one looks at some distinct subjects related to translation, language and culture raised by the translation of these papers. The content of this chapter is consequently very different from that of the chapters that precede it.

First, consideration is given to translation including the practice, challenges and need.

Next, the more general subject of the quality of Poincaré’s writing is addressed through a discussion of his election to the Académie Française. A discussion of the role of the Académie leads, in an aside, to an explanation of the correct pronunciation of the name of the physicist Augustin-Jean Fresnel.

Finally there is a discussion of the sharp contrasts marking the period of rapid change during which Henri Poincaré, Henri Becquerel, Pierre and Marie Curie and others appearing in the preceding chapters worked.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    On February 4, 2020, the website address was https://gallica.bnf.fr/accueil/en/content/accueil-en?mode=desktop

  2. 2.

    In an effort to avoid interference or unintended copying, I have not looked at these translations beyond the first page.

  3. 3.

    For a detailed view of the sociology of this time see (Prost, 2019). Barbara Tuchman (The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War, 1890–1914, 2011) famously wrote, “A phenomenon of such extended malignance as the Great War does not come out of a Golden Age.” Her book is suggested for a wider view of the era. The movie Midnight in Paris (Allen, 2011) has its own view of golden age thinking (“nostalgia in denial”). Adriana, a French woman from the 1920s, tells Gil Pender (portrayed by Marion Cottillard and Owen Wilson respectively), “For me la belle époque Paris would have been perfect.” and “It’s the greatest most beautiful era Paris has ever known.”

  4. 4.

    For details and more conflicts see (MacMillan, 2013).

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Popp, B.D. (2020). Translation, Language and Culture. In: Henri Poincaré: Electrons to Special Relativity. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-48039-4_13

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