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Culture and Social Change

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Abstract

This chapter begins with the cultural base of the SLP, as served up in its relationship to ethnicity, gender, information, social class, cultural costs and constraints, and temporal space. A discussion of social change follows.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    (http://www.salon.com/2017/03/02/fly-me-to-the-moon-elon-musks-spacex-rocket-men-or-women-will-launch-next-year. Retrieved 31 July 2017.

  2. 2.

    For those who must prepare a celebratory meal, that activity might be conceived of as a leisure project or, depending on attitude, a non-work obligation (see Bella 1992).

  3. 3.

    See also Backlund and Kuentzel (2013) for a similar argument on the relationship of serious leisure and the generation of social capital as it leads to social change.

  4. 4.

    This section is reprinted from Stebbins, R.A. (2018b, pp. 48–49).

  5. 5.

    Other early thinkers on deviant leisure, include Curtis (1988, on “purple recreation”) and Rojek (1997) on “abnormal leisure.”

  6. 6.

    Staci Newmahr (2011) sums up the highly complex scientific view of homosexuality vis-à-vis public sentiment on the matter: “irrespective of whether homosexuality is relevant as an analytical category, many people view deviation from the cultural norm of heterosexual dyadic partnerships as deeply problematic” (p. 258). That homosexuality is listed in this book as tolerably deviant leisure is consistent with commonsense and the micro-macro context within which same-sex activities are carried out.

  7. 7.

    See www.seriousleisure.net /Deviance for complete references.

  8. 8.

    Project-based leisure entered the SLP in 2005.

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Stebbins, R.A. (2020). Culture and Social Change. In: The Serious Leisure Perspective. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-48036-3_8

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