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Abstract

Discussion of information retrieval (IR) systems thus far has focused on the provision of retrieval mechanisms to access online content. But there are a host of larger issues related to access of information, such libraries, access to content, copyright and intellectual property (IP), preservation of digital materials, and open-access publishing with the emerging larger open science. This chapter expands the perspective on IR systems to look at their role in the context of access to information.

Keywords

  • Digital library
  • Metadata
  • Copyright
  • Fair use
  • Digital rights management
  • Open-access publishing
  • Preservation
  • Informationist

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Fig. 6.1

Notes

  1. 1.

    http://www.ala.org/

  2. 2.

    https://www.sla.org/

  3. 3.

    https://www.mlanet.org/

  4. 4.

    http://www.dlib.org/

  5. 5.

    http://www.jcdl.org/

  6. 6.

    https://fairsharing.org/

  7. 7.

    https://www.doi.org/

  8. 8.

    https://www.doi.org/hb.html

  9. 9.

    https://academic.oup.com/jamia/article/13/5/488/733702

  10. 10.

    https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-0-387-78703-9

  11. 11.

    https://www.crossref.org/

  12. 12.

    https://www.datacite.org/

  13. 13.

    https://www.force11.org/datacitationprinciples

  14. 14.

    https://zenodo.org/

  15. 15.

    http://www.openarchives.org/

  16. 16.

    http://www.openarchives.org/rs/resourcesync

  17. 17.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/tools/oai/

  18. 18.

    https://www.eagle-i.net/

  19. 19.

    http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4114-5148

  20. 20.

    https://wiki.hl7.org/Infobutton

  21. 21.

    https://www.healthit.gov/test-method/patient-specific-education-resources

  22. 22.

    https://medlineplus.gov/connect/overview.html

  23. 23.

    https://www.wipo.int/portal/en/

  24. 24.

    https://www.copyright.gov/title17/

  25. 25.

    https://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap1.html

  26. 26.

    https://fairuse.stanford.edu/overview/fair-use/

  27. 27.

    http://www.copyright.com/

  28. 28.

    https://creativecommons.org/

  29. 29.

    https://creativecommons.org/use-remix/cc-licenses/

  30. 30.

    https://search.creativecommons.org/

  31. 31.

    https://www.youtube.com/

  32. 32.

    https://www.wikipedia.org/

  33. 33.

    https://creativecommons.org/about/program-areas/education-oer/

  34. 34.

    https://creativecommons.org/about/program-areas/open-data/

  35. 35.

    https://creativecommons.org/about/program-areas/open-science/

  36. 36.

    https://www.taxpayeraccess.org/

  37. 37.

    https://www.fosteropenscience.eu/

  38. 38.

    https://www.biomedcentral.com/

  39. 39.

    https://www.plos.org/

  40. 40.

    https://publicaccess.nih.gov/

  41. 41.

    https://www.wellcome.ac.uk/

  42. 42.

    https://www.hhmi.org/

  43. 43.

    https://publicaccess.nih.gov/policy.htm

  44. 44.

    https://www.elsevier.com/about/policies/sharing

  45. 45.

    https://www.springernature.com/gp/authors/research-data-policy

  46. 46.

    https://predatoryjournals.com/journals/

  47. 47.

    https://doaj.org/

  48. 48.

    https://www.loc.gov/preservation/digital/

  49. 49.

    https://www.lockss.org/

  50. 50.

    https://clockss.org/

  51. 51.

    https://www.portico.org/

  52. 52.

    https://archive.org/

  53. 53.

    https://archive-it.org/

  54. 54.

    http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/

  55. 55.

    https://www.dpconline.org/

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Hersh, W. (2020). Access. In: Information Retrieval: A Biomedical and Health Perspective. Health Informatics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-47686-1_6

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