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Internationalizing Japan’s Undergraduate Education Through English Medium Instruction

  • Annette BradfordEmail author
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Part of the Educational Linguistics book series (EDUL, volume 44)

Abstract

Over the last decade, Japanese universities have increasingly integrated content and language as part of their efforts to internationalize. For Japan, integrated content and language endeavors are primarily focused on English medium instruction (EMI) set in motion by government initiatives to increase the numbers of international students in the country and educate Japanese students to become globally competitive. As EMI is becoming more widespread, it is finding ways to accommodate both international and domestic students. Program implementers are overcoming initial concerns, and EMI is finding its footing within the higher education system. However, some questions regarding its role still remain. This chapter outlines government policies that have promoted EMI growth and gives insights into how history and policy have affected patterns of EMI implementation. It describes some of the issues that undergraduate EMI programs are dealing with in their effort to internationalize higher education and reflects on the future directions for EMI in Japan.

Keywords

Japan English medium instruction Internationalization of higher education Undergraduate degree programs 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Oxford EMITokyoJapan

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