Skip to main content

Abstract

The introduction explains what imaginative culture is and why it matters. Imaginative culture—the subjects traditionally studied in the humanities—is that part of culture that consists in shared and transmissible mental experiences that are aesthetically and emotionally modulated. Such experiences include religion, ideology, and the arts. Evolutionary cultural theory has heretofore concerned itself mostly with technology and social organization. Imaginative culture is the last major piece in the puzzle of human nature. After describing the historical and disciplinary context for this volume and summarizing its contents, the introduction describes a toolkit of concepts and methods used by the authors in this volume: Tinbergen’s four categories of ethological analysis (phylogeny, ontogeny, mechanism, and adaptive function), cross-species comparison, cross-cultural comparison, and the psychology of individual identity. Under the category “mechanism,” subheadings include neuroscience, cognitive psychology, and the psychology of emotion. These concepts and methods are used as categories for describing subjects, observations, and arguments in the various chapters of the volume. “Directions for Further Research” identifies subject areas that have as yet received little attention from evolutionary scholars and scientists, describes opportunities for interdisciplinary collaborative research, and discusses the tension between institutional disciplinary inertia and the impulses of advancing knowledge.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 119.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 159.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD 159.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Similar content being viewed by others

References

  • Abrams, M. H. (1989). Types and orientations of critical theories. In M. Fischer (Ed.), Doing things with texts: Essays in criticism and critical theory (pp. 3–30). New York: Norton.

    Google Scholar 

  • Abrams, M. H. (1997). The transformation of English studies: 1930-1995. Dædalus: Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 126(1), 105–131.

    Google Scholar 

  • Asma, S. T., & Gabriel, R. (2019). The emotional mind: The affective roots of culture and cognition. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Barkow, J. H., Cosmides, L., & Tooby, J. (Eds.). (1992). The adapted mind: Evolutionary psychology and the generation of culture. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Baumard, N. (2019). Psychological origins of the Industrial Revolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 42, e189. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X1800211X

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Baumeister, R. F. (2005). The cultural animal: Human nature, meaning, and social life. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Beecher, D. (2016). Adapted brains and imaginary worlds: Cognitive science and the literature of the renaissance. Montreal: McGill-Queens University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Boehm, C. (2012). Moral origins: The evolution of virtue, altruism, and shame. New York: Basic Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Boehm, C. (2016). Bullies: Redefining the human free-rider problem. In J. Carroll, D. P. McAdams, & E. O. Wilson (Eds.), Darwin’s bridge: Uniting the humanities and sciences (pp. 11–27). New York: Oxford University Press.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Bogin, B. (1997). Evolutionary hypotheses for human childhood. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 104(S25), 63–89. https://doi.org/10.1002/(sici)1096-8644(1997)25+<63::Aid-ajpa3>3.0.Co;2-8

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Bogin, B. (2009). Childhood, adolescence, and longevity: A multilevel model of the evolution of reserve capacity in human life history. American Journal of Human Biology, 21(4), 567–577. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajhb.20895

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Bordwell, D. (2010). What snakes, eagles, and rhesus macaques can teach us. In B. Boyd, J. Carroll, & J. Gottschall (Eds.), Evolution, literature, and film: A reader (pp. 270–285). New York: Columbia University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Boyd, B. (2006). Getting it all wrong: Bioculture critiques cultural critique. American Scholar, 75(4), 18–30.

    Google Scholar 

  • Boyd, B. (2009). On the origin of stories: Evolution, cognition, and fiction. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Boyd, B. (2010a). On the origin of comics: New York double-take. Evolutionary Review: Art, Science, Culture, 1, 97–111.

    Google Scholar 

  • Boyd, B. (2010b). Art and evolution: The avant-garde as test-case: Spiegelman in The Narrative Corpse. In B. Boyd, J. Carroll, & J. Gottschall (Eds.), Evolution, literature, and film: A reader (pp. 433–454). New York: Columbia University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Boyd, B., Carroll, J., & Gottschall, J. (Eds.). (2010). Evolution, literature, and film: A reader. New York: Columbia University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Brown, D. E. (1991). Human universals. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Brown, D. E. (2000). Human universals and their implications. In N. Roughley (Ed.), Being humans: Anthropological universality and particularity in transdisciplinary perspectives (pp. 156–174). Berlin: de Gruyter.

    Google Scholar 

  • Brown, D. E. (2004). Human universals, human nature & human culture. Daedalus, 133(4), 47–54. https://doi.org/10.1162/0011526042365645

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Brown, D. E. (2017). Human universals (1991): Reflections on its whence and whither. Literary Universals Project. Retrieved from https://literary-universals.uconn.edu/2017/06/25/human-universals/

  • Buss, D. M. (Ed.). (2016). The handbook of evolutionary psychology (2nd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J. (1995). Evolution and literary theory. Columbia: University of Missouri Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J. (1998). Steven Pinker’s cheesecake for the mind. Philosophy and Literature, 22(2), 478–485. https://doi.org/10.1353/phl.1998.0036

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J. (2011). Reading human nature: Literary Darwinism in theory and practice. Albany: State University of New York Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J. (2012). The extremes of conflict in literature: Violence, homicide, and war. In T. K. Shackelford & V. A. Weekes-Shackelford (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of evolutionary perspectives on violence, homicide, and war (pp. 413–434). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J. (2013a). Correcting for The Corrections: A Darwinian critique of a Foucauldian novel. Style, 47(1), 87–118.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J. (2013b). Teaching literary Darwinism. Style, 47(2), 206–238.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J. (2015a). Evolutionary literary study. In D. M. Buss (Ed.), The Handbook of evolutionary psychology (Vol. 2, pp. 1529–1554). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. https://doi.org/10.1002/9781119125563.evpsych248

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J. (2015b). Evolved human sociality and literature. In R. Machalek, J. Turner, & A. Maryanski (Eds.), Handbook on evolution and society: Toward an evolutionary social science (pp. 572–608). Boulder, CO: Paradigm.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J. (2018a). Evolutionary literary theory. In D. H. Richter (Ed.), The Blackwell companion to literary theory (pp. 425–438). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J. (2018b). Minds and meaning in fictional narratives: An evolutionary perspective. Review of General Psychology, 22(2), 135–146. https://doi.org/10.1037/gpr0000104

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J. (2019). Death in literature. In T. K. Shackelford & V. Zeigler-Hill (Eds.), Evolutionary perspectives on death (pp. 137–159). Cham: Springer.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J., Clasen, M., Jonsson, E., Kratschmer, A. R., McKerracher, L., Riede, F., … Kjærgaard, P. C. (2017). Biocultural theory: The current state of knowledge. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 11(1), 1–15. https://doi.org/10.1037/ebs0000058

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J., Gottschall, J., Johnson, J. A., & Kruger, D. (2012). Graphing Jane Austen: The evolutionary basis of literary meaning. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J., Johnson, J. A., Salmon, C., Kjeldgaard-Christiansen, J., Clasen, M., & Jonsson, E. (2017). A cross-disciplinary survey of beliefs about human nature, culture, and science. Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture, 1(1), 1–32. https://doi.org/10.26613/esic/1.1.2

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, J., McAdams, D. P., & Wilson, E. O. (Eds.). (2016). Darwin’s bridge: Uniting the humanities and sciences. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chapais, B. (2008). Primeval kinship: How pair-bonding gave birth to human society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Chapais, B., Allen, N. J., Alvard, M., Apostolou, M., Barnard, A., Dunbar, R., … Read, D. W. (2014). Complex kinship patterns as evolutionary constructions, and the origins of sociocultural universals. Current Anthropology, 55(6), 751–783. https://doi.org/10.1086/678972

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Clasen, M. (2010). Vampire apocalypse: A biocultural critique of Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend. Philosophy and Literature, 34(2), 313–328. https://doi.org/10.1353/phl.2010.0005

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Clasen, M. (2011). Primal fear: A Darwinian perspective on Dan Simmons’ Song of Kali. Horror Studies, 2(1), 89–104. https://doi.org/10.1386/host.2.1.89_1

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Clasen, M. (2012). Monsters and horror stories: A biocultural approach. Aarhus, Denmark: Aarhus University.

    Google Scholar 

  • Clasen, M. (2014). Evil monsters in horror fiction: An evolutionary perspective on form and function. In S. Packer & J. Pennington (Eds.), A history of evil in popular culture: What Hannibal Lecter, Stephen King, and Vampires reveal about America (pp. 39–47). Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO/Praeger.

    Google Scholar 

  • Clasen, M. (2016). Terrifying monsters, malevolent ghosts, and evolved danger management architecture. In J. Carroll, D. P. McAdams, & E. O. Wilson (Eds.), Darwin’s bridge: Uniting the humanities and sciences (pp. 183–193). New York: Oxford University Press.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Clasen, M. (2017). Why horror seduces. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Clasen, M. (2018). Evolutionary study of horror literature. In K. Corstorphine & L. R. Kremmel (Eds.), The Palgrave handbook to horror literature (pp. 355–363). Cham: Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Clasen, M., Andersen, M., & Schjoedt, U. (2019). Adrenaline junkies and white-knucklers: A quantitative study of fear management in haunted house visitors. Poetics, 73, 61–71. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.poetic.2019.01.002

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Clasen, M., Kjeldgaard-Christiansen, J., & Johnson, J. A. (2018). Horror, personality, and threat simulation: A survey on the psychology of scary media. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences. https://doi.org/10.1037/ebs0000152

  • Cochran, G., & Harpending, H. (2009). The 10,000 year explosion: How civilization accelerated human evolution. New York: Basic Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cooke, B., & Turner, F. (Eds.). (1999). Biopoetics: Evolutionary explorations in the arts. Lexington, KY: ICUS.

    Google Scholar 

  • Costa, P. T., Jr., & McCrae, R. R. (1997). Personality trait structure as a human universal. American Psychologist, 52(5), 509–516.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Cowen, A. S., Elfenbein, H. A., Laukka, P., & Keltner, D. (2018). Mapping 24 emotions conveyed by brief human vocalization. American Psychologist, 74(6), 698–712. https://doi.org/10.1037/amp0000399

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Cowen, A. S., & Keltner, D. (2017). Self-report captures 27 distinct categories of emotion bridged by continuous gradients. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 114(38), E7900–E7909. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1702247114

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  • Cowen, A. S., & Keltner, D. (2018). Clarifying the conceptualization, dimensionality, and structure of emotion: Response to Barrett and colleagues. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 22(4), 274–276. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2018.02.003

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  • Cowen, A. S., & Keltner, D. (2019). What the face displays: Mapping 28 emotions conveyed by naturalistic expression. American Psychologist, 75(3), 349–364.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Crews, F. C. (1986). Skeptical engagements. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Culler, J. D. (1997). Literary theory: A very short introduction. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Curry, O. S. (2016). Morality as cooperation: A problem-centred approach. In T. K. Shackelford & R. D. Hansen (Eds.), The evolution of morality (pp. 27–51). Cham: Springer.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Darwin, C. (1859). On the origin of species. London: J. Murray.

    Google Scholar 

  • Darwin, C. (1872). The expression of the emotions in man and animals. London: J. Murray.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Darwin, C. (1981). The descent of man, and selection in relation to sex. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press. (Original work published 1871).

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Dawkins, R. (1986). The blind watchmaker. New York: Norton.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dissanayake, E. (1988). What is art for? Seattle: University of Washington Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dissanayake, E. (1992). Homo aestheticus: Where art comes from and why. New York: Free Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dissanayake, E. (2000). Art and intimacy: How the arts began. Seattle: University of Washington Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dissanayake, E. (2011). In the beginning, evolution created religion and the arts. The Evolutionary Review: Art, Science, Culture, 2, 64–81.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dutton, D. (2009). The art instinct: Beauty, pleasure, and human evolution. New York: Bloomsbury.

    Google Scholar 

  • Easterlin, N. (2000). Psychoanalysis and ‘The Discipline of Love’. Philosophy and Literature, 24(2), 261–279. https://doi.org/10.1353/phl.2000.0033

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Ekman, P. (2007). Emotions revealed: Recognizing faces and feelings to improve communication and emotional life (2nd ed.). New York: Owl Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ekman, P. (2016). What scientists who study emotion agree about. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 11(1), 31–34. https://doi.org/10.1177/1745691615596992

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Fukuyama, F. (2011). The origins of political order: From prehuman times to the French revolution. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fukuyama, F. (2014). Political order and political decay: From the industrial revolution to the globalization of democracy. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gintis, H., van Schaik, C., & Boehm, C. (2015). Zoon politikon: The evolutionary origins of human political systems. Current Anthropology, 56(3), 327–353.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Gottschall, J. (2008a). Literature, science, and a new humanities. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Gottschall, J. (2008b). The rape of Troy: Evolution, violence, and the world of Homer. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Gottschall, J., Allison, E., De Rosa, J., & Klockeman, K. (2006). Can literary study be scientific? Results of an empirical search for the virgin/whore dichotomy. Interdisciplinary Literary Studies, 7(2), 1–17.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Gottschall, J., & Nordlund, M. (2006). Romantic love: A literary universal? Philosophy and Literature, 30(2), 450–470.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Graham, J., Nosek, B. A., & Haidt, J. (2012). The moral stereotypes of liberals and conservatives: Exaggeration of differences across the political spectrum. PLoS One, 7(12), e50092. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0050092

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  • Grodal, T. K. (2009). Embodied visions: Evolution, emotion, culture, and film. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Hanlon, G. (2007). Human nature in rural Tuscany: An early modern history (1st ed.). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Harris, P. L. (2000). The work of the imagination. Oxford: Blackwell Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Harris, P. L. (2018). Children’s understanding of death: From biology to religion. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 373(1754).

    Google Scholar 

  • Henrich, J. (2016). The secret of our success: How culture is driving human evolution, domesticating our species, and making us smarter. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Hill, K. (2007). Evolutionary biology, cognitive adaptations, and human culture. In S. W. Gangestad & J. A. Simpson (Eds.), The evolution of mind: Fundamental questions and controversies (pp. 348–356). New York: Guilford Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hogan, P. C. (2013). How authors’ minds make stories. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Hogan, P. C. (2016). Beauty and sublimity: A cognitive aesthetics of literature and the arts. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hrdy, S. B. (1999). Mother nature: A history of mothers, infants, and natural selection (1st ed.). New York: Pantheon Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hrdy, S. B. (2009). Mothers and others: The evolutionary origins of mutual understanding. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Izard, C. E. (1978). Emotions as motivations: An evolutionary-developmental perspective. In R. A. Dienstbier (Ed.), Nebraska symposium on motivation 1978 (pp. 163–200). Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Izard, C. E. (2007a). Basic emotions, natural kinds, emotion schemas, and a new paradigm. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 2(3), 260–280. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-6916.2007.00044.x

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Izard, C. E. (2007b). Emotion feelings stem from evolution and neurobiological development, not from conceptual acts: Corrections for Barrett et al. (2007). Perspectives on Psychological Science, 2(4), 404–405. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-6916.2007.00053.x

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Jacobs, A. M., & Willems, R. M. (2018). The fictive brain: Neurocognitive correlates of engagement in literature. Review of General Psychology, 22(2), 147–160. https://doi.org/10.1037/gpr0000106

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Johnson, J. A., Carroll, J., Gottschall, J., & Kruger, D. J. (2008). Hierarchy in the library: Egalitarian dynamics in Victorian novels. Evolutionary Psychology, 6(4), 715–738. https://doi.org/10.1177/147470490800600414

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Johnson, J. A., Carroll, J., Gottschall, J., & Kruger, D. J. (2011). Portrayal of personality in Victorian novels reflects modern research findings but amplifies the significance of agreeableness. Journal of Research in Personality, 45(1), 50–80. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jrp.2010.11.011

  • Johnson-Laird, P. N., & Oatley, K. (2016). Emotions in music, literature, and film. In L. F. Barrett, M. Lewis, & J. M. Haviland-Jones (Eds.), Handbook of emotions (4th ed., pp. 82–97). New York: Guilford.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jonsson, E. (2013). The human species and the good gripping dreams of H. G. Wells. Style, 47(3), 296–315.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jonsson, E. (2018). T. H. Huxley, Arthur Conan Doyle, and the impact of evolution on the human self-narrative. Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture, 2(1), 59–74. https://doi.org/10.26613/esic/2.1.74

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Jonsson, E. (forthcoming). Evolutionary literary theory. In T. K. Shackelford (Ed.), The Sage handbook of evolutionary psychology. Volume 2: Integrations with other disciplines. London: Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kaplan, H. S., Gurven, M., & Lancaster, J. B. (2007). Brain evolution and the human adaptive complex: An ecological and social theory. In S. W. Gangestad & J. A. Simpson (Eds.), The evolution of mind: Fundamental questions and controversies (pp. 269–279). New York: Guilford Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Keltner, D., Oatley, K., & Jenkins, J. M. (2014). Understanding emotions (3rd ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

    Google Scholar 

  • Keltner, D., Sauter, D., Tracy, J., & Cowen, A. (2019). Emotional expression: Advances in basic emotion theory. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 43(2), 133–160. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10919-019-00293-3

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  • Keltner, D., Tracy, J. L., Sauter, D., & Cowen, A. (2019). What basic emotion theory really says for the twenty-first century study of emotion. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 43(2), 195–201. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10919-019-00298-y

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  • Kenrick, D. T. (2011). Sex, murder, and the meaning of life: A psychologist investigates how evolution, cognition, and complexity are revolutionizing our view of human nature. New York: Basic Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kjeldgaard-Christiansen, J. (2016). Evil origins: A Darwinian genealogy of the popcultural villain. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 10, 109–122. https://doi.org/10.1037/ebs0000057

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kjeldgaard-Christiansen, J. (2017). The bad breaks of Walter White: An evolutionary approach to the fictional antihero. Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture, 1(1), 103–120. https://doi.org/10.26613/esic/1.1.19

  • Kjeldgaard-Christiansen, J., & Clasen, M. (2019). Threat simulation in virtual limbo: An evolutionary approach to horror video games. Journal of Gaming and Virtual Worlds, 11(2), 119–138. https://doi.org/10.1386/jgvw.11.2.119_1

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kjeldgaard-Christiansen, J., & Schmidt, S. H. (2019). Disney’s shifting visions of villainy from the 1990s to the 2010s: A biocultural analysis. Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture, 3(2), 1–16. https://doi.org/10.26613/esic.3.2.140

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Konner, M. (2010). The evolution of childhood: Relationships, emotion, mind. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kruger, D. J., Fisher, M., & Jobling, I. (2003). Proper and dark heroes as dads and cads: Alternative mating strategies in British and Romantic literature. Human Nature, 14(3), 305–317.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Kruger, D. J., & Jonsson, E. (2019). The Viking and the farmer: Alternative male life histories portrayed in the Romantic poetry of Erik Gustaf Geijer. Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture, 3(2), 17–38. https://doi.org/10.26613/esic.3.2.141

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Lawson, E. T. (2019). Philosophical, neurological, and sociological perspectives on religion. Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture, 3(1), 105–110. https://doi.org/10.26613/esic.3.1.128

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Low, B. S. (2015). Why sex matters: A Darwinian look at human behavior (Revised edition). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lumsden, C. J., & Wilson, E. O. (1981). Genes, mind, and culture: The coevolutionary process. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lumsden, C. J., & Wilson, E. O. (1983). Promethean fire: Reflections on the origin of mind. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mar, R. A., & Oatley, K. (2008). The function of fiction is the abstraction and simulation of social experience. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 3(3), 173–192. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-6924.2008.00073.x

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Mar, R. A., Oatley, K., Djikic, M., & Mullin, J. (2011). Emotion and narrative fiction: Interactive influences before, during, and after reading. Cognition & Emotion, 25(5), 818–833. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699931.2010.515151

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • McAdams, D. P. (2015). The art and science of personality development. New York: Guilford Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • McAdams, D. P. (2018). Narrative identity: What is it? What does it do? How do you measure it? Imagination Cognition and Personality, 37(3), 359–372. https://doi.org/10.1177/0276236618756704

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • McAdams, D. P. (2019). “First we invented stories, then they changed us”: The evolution of narrative identity. Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture, 3(1), 1–18. https://doi.org/10.26613/esic.3.1.110

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • McConachie, B. A. (2008). Engaging audiences: A cognitive approach to spectating in the theatre. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • McCrae, R. R., Gaines, J. F., & Wellington, M. A. (2012). The five-factor model in fact and fiction. In I. B. Weiner (Ed.), Handbook of psychology: Personality and social psychology (Vol. 5, 2nd ed., pp. 65–91). NJ: Hoboken.

    Google Scholar 

  • McLean, K. C. (2016). The co-authored self: Family stories and the construction of personal identity (1st ed.). New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • McLean, K. C., & Syed, M. U. (2015). The Oxford handbook of identity development. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Miller, G. F. (2000). The mating mind: How sexual choice shaped the evolution of human nature. New York: Doubleday.

    Google Scholar 

  • Muehlenbein, M. P., & Flinn, M. V. (2011). Patterns and processes of human life history evolution. In T. Flatt & A. Heyland (Eds.), Mechanisms of life history evolution: The genetics and physiology of life history traits and trade-offs (pp. 153–168). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Nesse, R. M. (2019). Good reasons for bad feelings: Insights from the frontier of evolutionary psychiatry. New York: Dutton.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nestler, E. J., Hyman, S. E., & Malenka, R. C. (2009). Molecular neuropharmacology: A foundation for clinical neuroscience (2nd ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill Medical.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nettle, D. (2007). Personality: What makes you the way you are. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nummenmaa, L., & Saarimäki, H. (2019). Emotions as discrete patterns of systemic activity. Neuroscience Letters, 693, 3–8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2017.07.012

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Oatley, K. (2011). Such stuff as dreams: The psychology of fiction. Chichester, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Oatley, K. (2012). The passionate muse: Exploring emotion in stories. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Oatley, K. (2016). Fiction: Simulation of social worlds. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 20(8), 618–628. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tics.2016.06.002

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Oatley, K., Mar, R. A., & Djikic, M. (2012). Postscript. The psychology of fiction: Present and future. In I. Jaén & J. J. Simon (Eds.), Cognitive literary studies: Current themes and new directions (pp. 235–249). Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Palmer, C. T., Newsome, A., Proud, K., & Coe, K. (2010). Facebook or lonesome no more. Evolutionary Review, 1, 24–29.

    Google Scholar 

  • Panksepp, J. (2000). Emotions as natural kinds within the mammalian brain. In M. Lewis & J. M. Haviland-Jones (Eds.), Handbook of emotions (pp. 137–156). New York: Guilford.

    Google Scholar 

  • Panksepp, J., & Biven, L. (2012). The archaeology of mind: Neuroevolutionary origins of human emotions. New York: Norton.

    Google Scholar 

  • Patai, D. (2005). Theory’s empire: An anthology of dissent. New York: Columbia University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pinker, S. (1994). The language instinct. New York: W. Morrow.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Pinker, S. (1997). How the mind works. New York: Norton.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pinker, S. (2007). Toward a consilient study of literature. Philosophy and Literature, 31(1), 162–178. https://doi.org/10.1353/phl.2007.0016

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Richardson, A. (2015). Imagination: Literary and cognitive intersections. In L. Zunshine (Ed.), Oxford handbook of cognitive literary studies (pp. 225–245). New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Richardson, A., & Spolsky, E. (Eds.). (2004). The work of fiction: Cognition, culture, and complexity. Aldershot, England: Ashgate.

    Google Scholar 

  • Richerson, P. J., & Boyd, R. (2005). Not by genes alone: How culture transformed human evolution. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Salmon, C. (2003). Warrior lovers: Erotic fiction, evolution and female sexuality. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Salmon, C. (2012). The pop culture of sex: An evolutionary window on the worlds of pornography and romance. Review of General Psychology, 16(2), 152–160. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0027910

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Salmon, C. (2016). What do romance novels, pro wrestling, and Mack Bolan have in common: Consilience and the pop culture of storytelling. In J. Carroll, D. P. McAdams, & E. O. Wilson (Eds.), Darwin’s bridge: Uniting the humanities and science (pp. 167–182). New York: Oxford University Press.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Salmon, C. (2018). Evolutionary perspectives on popular culture: State of the art. Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture, 2(2), 47–66. https://doi.org/10.26613/esic.2.2.92

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Salmon, C., & Diamond, A. (2012). Evolutionary perspectives on the content analysis of heterosexual and homosexual pornography. Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology, 6(2), 193–202.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Salmon, C., & Shackelford, T. K. (Eds.). (2011). The Oxford handbook of evolutionary family psychology. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Salmon, C., & Symons, D. (2004). Slash fiction and human mating psychology. Journal of Sex Research, 41(1), 94–100. https://doi.org/10.1080/00224490409552217

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Saunders, J. P. (2009). Reading Edith Wharton through a Darwinian lens: Evolutionary biological issues in her fiction. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

    Google Scholar 

  • Saunders, J. P. (2015). Darwinian literary analysis of sexuality. In T. K. Shackelford & R. D. Hansen (Eds.), The evolution of sexuality (pp. 29–55). New York: Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Saunders, J. P. (2018). American classics: Evolutionary perspectives. Brighton, MA: Academic Studies Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Scalise Sugiyama, M. (2012). From theory to practice: Foundations of an evolutionary literary curriculum. Style, 46(3–4), 317–337.

    Google Scholar 

  • Shackman, A. J., & Wager, T. D. (2019). The emotional brain: Fundamental questions and strategies for future research. Neuroscience Letters, 693, 68–74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neulet.2018.10.012

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Slingerland, E. G., & Collard, M. (2012). Creating consilience: Integrating the sciences and the humanities. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Smail, D. L. (2008). On deep history and the brain. Berkeley: University of California Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Smith, M. (2017). Film, art, and the third culture: A naturalized aesthetics of film. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Smith, S. M., & Vale, W. W. (2006). The role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in neuroendocrine responses to stress. Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience, 8(4), 383–395.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  • Spolsky, E. (1993). Gaps in nature: Literary interpretation and the modular mind. Albany: State University of New York Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Spolsky, E. (2009). The centrality of the exceptional in literary study. Style, 42(2–3), 285–289.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sterelny, K. (2003). Thought in a hostile world: The evolution of human cognition. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

    Google Scholar 

  • Storey, R. F. (1996). Mimesis and the human animal: On the biogenetic foundations of literary representation. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Suddendorf, T. (2013). The gap: The science of what separates us from other animals. New York: Basic Books.

    Google Scholar 

  • Suddendorf, T., & Corballis, M. C. (2007). The evolution of foresight: What is mental time travel, and is it unique to humans? Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 30(03), 299–313.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  • Sznycer, D., Cosmides, L., & Tooby, J. (2017). Adaptationism carves emotions at their functional joints. Psychological Inquiry, 28(1), 56–62. https://doi.org/10.1080/1047840X.2017.1256132

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Taylor, M. (2013). Imagination. In P. D. Zelazo (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of developmental psychology (pp. 791–831). New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tennie, C., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2009). Ratcheting up the ratchet: On the evolution of cumulative culture. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 364(1528), 2405–2415. https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2009.0052

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Tinbergen, N. (1963). On aims and methods of ethology. Zeitschrift für Tierpsychologie, 20(4), 410–433.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Tomasello, M. (2019). Becoming human: A theory of ontogeny. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Tomasello, M., Carpenter, M., Call, J., Behne, T., & Moll, H. (2005). Understanding and sharing intentions: The origins of cultural cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 28(5), 675–691 (target article followed by responses and a rejoinder). https://doi.org/10.1017/s0140525x05000129

  • Tooby, J., & Cosmides, L. (1992). The psychological foundations of culture. In J. H. Barkow, L. Cosmides, & J. Tooby (Eds.), The adapted mind: Evolutionary psychology and the generation of culture (pp. 19–136). New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tooby, J., & Cosmides, L. (2001). Does beauty build adapted minds? Toward an evolutionary theory of aesthetics, fiction, and the arts. SubStance, 30(1), 6–27. https://doi.org/10.1353/sub.2001.0017

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Tracy, J. L. (2014). An evolutionary approach to understanding distinct emotions. Emotion Review, 6(4), 308–312. https://doi.org/10.1177/1754073914534478

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Turchin, P. (2006). War and peace and war: The life cycles of imperial nations. New York: Pi.

    Google Scholar 

  • Turchin, P., Currie, T. E., Turner, E. A. L., & Gavrilets, S. (2013). War, space, and the evolution of Old World complex societies. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(41), 16384–16389. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1308825110

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  • Turpin, J. P., & Fuhrman, R. W. (2012). Adaptive and maladaptive poetry: In Plath, Roethke, Kunitz, and Moraga. Style, 46(3–4), 479–499.

    Google Scholar 

  • Vanderbeke, D., & Cooke, B. (Eds.). (2019). Evolution and popular narrative. Boston: Brill.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, E. O. (1998). Consilience: The unity of knowledge. New York: Knopf.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, D. S. (2007). Evolution for everyone: How Darwin’s theory can change the way we think about our lives. New York: Delacorte.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wilson, D. S., Geher, G., & Waldo, J. (2009). EvoS: Completing the evolutionary synthesis in higher education. EvoS Journal: The Journal of the Evolutionary Studies Consortium, 1(1), 3–10. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12052-011-0319-4

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Winkelman, M. A. (2013). A cognitive approach to John Donne’s songs and sonnets. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Wood, C., & Shaver, J. H. (2018). Religion, evolution, and the basis of institutions: The institutional cognition model of religion. Evolutionary Studies in Imaginative Culture, 2(2), 1–20. https://doi.org/10.26613/esic.2.2.89

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Zunshine, L. (Ed.). (2015). The Oxford handbook of cognitive literary studies. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgments

For invaluable help in preparing this volume for submission to the publisher, we would like to give a heartfelt thanks to Stephen Bjerregaard and Daniel Ingemann Kroier Pedersen.

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Joseph Carroll .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2020 The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Carroll, J., Clasen, M., Jonsson, E. (2020). Introduction. In: Carroll, J., Clasen, M., Jonsson, E. (eds) Evolutionary Perspectives on Imaginative Culture. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-46190-4_1

Download citation

Publish with us

Policies and ethics