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Healthy Habits: Positive Psychology, Journaling, Meditation, and Nature Therapy

Abstract

This chapter contributes to the body of knowledge about the value of stress-relieving practices such as positive psychology, journaling, meditation, and nature therapy for medical residents and practicing physicians as a part of their regular routine. Given the physical, cognitive, and emotional demands on physicians, adopting these creative and mindful applications may mitigate feelings of burnout, anxiety, and overwhelm, as well as promote a happier and healthier mental state in physicians’ personal and professional lives.

Keywords

  • Positive psychology
  • Journaling
  • Meditation
  • Nature therapy
  • Mindfulness
  • Alternative therapies
  • Resident wellness
  • Physician burnout

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Riddell, T., Nassif, J., Hategan, A., Jarecki, J. (2020). Healthy Habits: Positive Psychology, Journaling, Meditation, and Nature Therapy. In: Hategan, A., Saperson, K., Harms, S., Waters, H. (eds) Humanism and Resilience in Residency Training. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-45627-6_14

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-45627-6_14

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