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Domestic and External Factors in the Syrian Conflict: Toward a Multi-causal Explanation

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Abstract

What are the major domestic and external factors that have led to the emergence and diffusion of the 2011 Syrian conflict? Domestic factors concern Syria’s political-economic and political-ecological transitions since the 1970s, particularly the prominence of a resource-based, or extractivist, strategy of economic development, neoliberal restructuring, and inadequate environmental policies. This chapter argues that these factors have rendered Syria vulnerable to the destructive effect of external pressures associated with the role of geopolitics, proxy war, and foreign intervention. In terms of this chapter’s methodology, process tracing is used as the main guideline.

Keywords

  • Energy security
  • Environmental policy
  • Extractivism
  • Military alliance
  • Syria

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Gürcan, E.C. (2020). Domestic and External Factors in the Syrian Conflict: Toward a Multi-causal Explanation. In: Amour, P. (eds) The Regional Order in the Gulf Region and the Middle East. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-45465-4_11

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