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On the Evaluation of ‘Self-perceived Age’ for Europeans and Americans

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Part of the The Springer Series on Demographic Methods and Population Analysis book series (PSDE,volume 50)

Abstract

The aims of the study are to estimate ‘Self-perceived age’ by reference to life tables and to evaluate its validity in comparison with actual mortality patterns. We use data from the 6th Wave of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (RAND SHARE), the 12th Wave of Health and Retirement Study (RAND HRS) and life tables from the Human Mortality Database (HMD). For the statistical analysis we employ regression models. Our results indicate that health status and frequency of physical activities imply similar patterns of ‘Self-perceived age’ and actual mortality patterns. Individuals with better health tend to have younger ‘Self-perceived age’ and lower actual mortality. However, the impact of memory and cognitive function differentiates between Europeans and Americans. ‘Self-perceived age’ is expressed in years, is linked to a population life table and it could be used to detect early changes in future life expectancy.

Keywords

  • Self-perceived age
  • Subjective survival probabilities
  • HRS
  • SHARE
  • HMD
  • Welfare states

This work has been partly supported by the University of Piraeus Research Center.

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Acknowledgements

This paper uses data from SHARE Wave 6 (DOI: https://doi.org/10.6103/SHARE.w6.600), see Börsch-Supan et al. (2013) for methodological details. The SHARE data collection has been primarily funded by the European Commission through FP5 (QLK6-CT-2001-00360), FP6 (SHARE-I3: RII-CT-2006-062193, COMPARE: CIT5-CT-2005-028857, SHARELIFE: CIT4-CT-2006-028812) and FP7 (SHARE-PREP: N°211909, SHARE-LEAP: N°227822, SHARE M4: N°261982). Additional funding from the German Ministry of Education and Research, the Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science, the U.S. National Institute on Aging (U01_AG09740-13S2, P01_AG005842, P01_AG08291, P30_AG12815, R21_AG025169, Y1-AG-4553-01, IAG_BSR06-11, OGHA_04-064, HHSN271201300071C) and from various national funding sources is gratefully acknowledged (see www.share-project.org).

This analysis uses data or information from the Harmonized HRS dataset and Codebook, Version A as of February 2018 developed by the Gateway to Global Aging Data. The development of the Harmonized HRS was funded by the National Institute on Aging (R01 AG030153, RC2 AG036619, 1R03AG043052). For more information, please refer to www.g2aging.org.

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Correspondence to Apostolos Papachristos .

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Papachristos, A., Verropoulou, G. (2020). On the Evaluation of ‘Self-perceived Age’ for Europeans and Americans. In: Skiadas, C.H., Skiadas, C. (eds) Demography of Population Health, Aging and Health Expenditures. The Springer Series on Demographic Methods and Population Analysis, vol 50. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-44695-6_16

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-44695-6_16

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