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The Feminine Voice in Philosophy

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Part of the Women in the History of Philosophy and Sciences book series (WHPS, volume 3)

Abstract

Despite the call for gender equality, philosophy remains male-centered with women somewhat peripheral to the enterprise; this is not only in terms of its physical and visible aspects but also in the way philosophy is done. When it comes to the question of how the female voice is perceived, expressed and represented, there still remains an imbalance. The questions of what ‘the female voice’ might mean and who it is that represents still remains open. In response, this paper proposes to re-place the subject of philosophy and the subject of a woman through an alternative idea of the feminine voice in philosophy. By examining Paul Standish’s idea of the ‘feminine-receptive mode’ of language and thought and Stanley Cavell’s feminism of the father tongue, it tries to reconfigure the female voice without negating its fated biological origin and traits, yet avoid the confining of thought to the constraints of gender divides. It does this in order to represent the feminine in terms of an archetype, as an aspect of the very nature of language. The educational implication of this is the conversation of justice as a way of cultivating the feminine voice in philosophy.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of EducationKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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