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The Water-Migration Nexus: An Analysis of Causalities and Response Mechanisms with a Focus on the Global South

Part of the United Nations University Series on Regionalism book series (UNSR,volume 20)

Abstract

Global migration, influenced by environmental and climate crises, has seen a steep rise in the past three decades. Socio-economic and climatic vulnerability and socio-political volatilities in the developing regions and emerging economies of/in the Global South closely connect with the human migration flows worldwide. Interlinkages between water and climate crisis and human migration trends and patterns are complex and multidimensional and call priority planning and action. For instance, migration has not received formal status as a coping strategy in water security planning or climate change adaptation programs and policies. Also, regional and national actors and agencies, global institutions, do properly acknowledged ‘water’ and ‘climate’ crisis as a push factor for human displacement. As such crises intensify, the need for a better understanding of the complex set of drivers and dynamics that influence decisions to migrate is crucial, especially for the Global South.

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Notes

  1. 1.

    Cameroon noted little more than 8%, and Nigeria only around 1%, of the total migration occurring because of natural disasters (IOM 2016).

  2. 2.

    Available at https://www.iom.int/sites/default/files/our_work/ODG/GCM/NY_Declaration.pdf

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Acknowledgments

The authors are grateful to those who provided content, case studies and other inputs during the preparation of the script, including Tariq Deen, Leia Jones, Jana Gheuens, Jisoo Sohn, Eunjung Lee, and Jiyun Nam, all interns and research fellows at UNU-INWEH in 2018. The authors also thank Dr. Rupal Brahmbhatt, research consultant of UNU-INWEH on migration analysis. The work of the Lead Author of this report is supported by UNU-INWEH through a long-term agreement with Global Affairs Canada. The co-author would like to acknowledge his Ph.D. funding through an Ontario Graduate Scholarship that helped his internship at UNU-INWEH, and a Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarships (CGS) Doctoral Scholarship that supported his work on this chapter.

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Nagabhatla, N., Fioret, C. (2020). The Water-Migration Nexus: An Analysis of Causalities and Response Mechanisms with a Focus on the Global South. In: Rayp, G., Ruyssen, I., Marchand, K. (eds) Regional Integration and Migration Governance in the Global South. United Nations University Series on Regionalism, vol 20. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-43942-2_4

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