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Nutraceuticals: History, Classification and Market Demand

Abstract

Nutraceuticals are food or part of food that offers medical/health benefits including the prevention and treatment of diseases. In a more general term, they are natural substances that include certain herbs that are used as dietary supplements and regulated as foods. Plant derived nutraceuticals have received significant consideration because of their supposed safety, and multiple nutritional and therapeutic effects. They are widely seen as a prevailing instrument that acts against nutritionally induced acute and chronic diseases, thus promoting good health and longevity. The nutraceuticals as herbal and dietary supplement is rapidly growing and has gained a global market that is estimated at over 100 billion USD. Among the common plant-derived (herbal) nutraceuticals are curcumin from turmeric, glucosamine from ginseng and omega-3- fatty acids from linseed. This chapter presents an overview of nutraceuticals, the herbals used as nutraceuticals, the regulation of herbal nutraceuticals and an overall perspective of herbal nutraceutical’s global market.

Keywords

  • Nutraceuticals
  • Herbal
  • Dietary supplement
  • Nutrients
  • Global market

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Nwosu, O.K., Ubaoji, K.I. (2020). Nutraceuticals: History, Classification and Market Demand. In: Egbuna, C., Dable Tupas, G. (eds) Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-42319-3_2

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