Skip to main content

Assessment as and of Digital Practice: Building Productive Digital Literacies

  • Chapter
  • First Online:
Re-imagining University Assessment in a Digital World

Part of the book series: The Enabling Power of Assessment ((EPAS,volume 7))

Abstract

Most modes of assessment in higher education, apart from paper-based exams, use some form of digital technology. However, assessments that scaffold, develop and assess integrated digital practices are much rarer. Even when using newer digital modes such as blogging, assessments often only replicate traditional textual practices with little attention paid to the specific multimodal, networked affordances of the medium. This paper will frame an approach to sustainable and productive digital assessment through integrated digital practice that emphasizes the reflexivity necessary for participatory networked communication. Such a framework seeks to move from the textual/compositional bias which governs much assessment practice in higher education towards genuine digital assessments which engage students as designers and assess their digital design literacies as well as their critical encounters with discipline knowledge.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Subscribe and save

Springer+ Basic
EUR 32.99 /Month
  • Get 10 units per month
  • Download Article/Chapter or eBook
  • 1 Unit = 1 Article or 1 Chapter
  • Cancel anytime
Subscribe now

Buy Now

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 119.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 159.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD 179.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Similar content being viewed by others

Notes

  1. 1.

    This is more true of the humanities and social sciences than of the sciences or design disciplines like engineering but even though the sciences may rely less on essay style texts they are often even more dependent on assessment as knowledge-based recall whether through textual or computational notation.

  2. 2.

    This class was often 150+ students divided over 5–6 seminar groups so the negotiation of this collective rubric was another digitally mediated process done with simple Google Docs technology.

References

  • Aoun, J. E. (2017). Robot-proof: Higher education in the age of artificial intelligence. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Bayne, S. (2015). What’s the matter with ‘technology-enhanced learning’? Learning. Media and Technology, 40(1), 5–20.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Bezemer, J., & Kress, G. (2008). Writing in multimodal texts: A social semiotic account of designs for learning. Written Communication, 25(2), 166–195.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Blood, R. (2000, September 7). Weblogs: A history and perspective. Rebecca’s Pocket. Retrieved from http://www.rebeccablood.net/essays/weblog_history.html.

  • Boud, D., & Soler, R. (2016). Sustainable assessment revisited. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 41(3), 400–413.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Carlgren, L., Rauth, I., & Elmquist, M. (2016). Framing design thinking: The concept in idea and enactment. Creativity and Innovation Management, 25(1), 38–57.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Cross, N. (2006). Designerly ways of knowing. London: Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Deng, L., & Yuen, A. H. K. (2011). Towards a framework for educational affordances of blogs. Computers & Education, 56(2), 441–451.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Garden, M. (2012). Defining blog: A fool’s errand or a necessary undertaking. Journalism, 13(4), 483–499.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Goodyear, P., Carvalho, L., & Dohn, N. B. (2014). Design for networked learning: Framing relations between participants’ activities and the physical setting. In S. Bayne, C. Jones, M. de Laat, T. Ryberg, & C. Sinclair (Eds.), Proceedings of the 9th international conference on networked learning 2014 (pp. 137–144). Edinburgh: Networked Learning Conference Committee.

    Google Scholar 

  • Griffin, P., & Care, E. (2014). Project method. In P. Griffin & E. Care (Eds.), Assessment and Teaching of 21st century skills: Methods and approach. Dordrecht: Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Herring, S. C., Schiedt, L. A., Bonus, S., & Wright, E. (2004). Bridging the gap: A genre analysis of weblogs. In Proceedings of the 37th annual Hawaii international conference on system sciences, 2004. Hawaii: IEEE.

    Google Scholar 

  • Johansson-Sköldberg, U., Woodilla, J., & Çetinkaya, M. (2013). Design thinking: Past, present and possible futures. Creativity and Innovation Management, 22(2), 121–146.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kim, H. N. (2008). The phenomenon of blogs and theoretical model of blog use in educational contexts. Computers & Education, 51(3), 1342–1352.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kirkwood, A., & Price, L. (2014). Technology-enhanced learning and teaching in higher education: What is ‘enhanced’ and how do we know? A critical literature review. Learning, Media and Technology, 39(1), 6–36.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kirkwood, A., & Price, L. (2013a). Missing: Evidence of a scholarly approach to teaching and learning with technology in higher education. Teaching in Higher Education, 18(3), 327–337.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kirkwood, A., & Price, L. (2013b). Examining some assumptions and limitations of research on the effects of emerging technologies for teaching and learning in higher education. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(4), 536–543.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Kolb, D. A. (2014). Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. London: FT Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Laurillard, D. (2008). The teacher as action researcher: Using technology to capture pedagogic form. Studies in Higher Education, 33(2), 139–154.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Laurillard, D. (2013). Teaching as a design science: Building pedagogical patterns for learning and technology. Hoboken: Routledge.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Levinsen, K., & Sørensen, B. H. (2013). Students as learning designers. In R. McBride & M. Searson (Eds.), Proceedings of the Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2013 (pp. 5142–5149). Chesapeake: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education.

    Google Scholar 

  • Marsh, E. (2018). Understanding the effect of digital literacy on employees’ digital workplace continuance intentions and individual performance. International Journal of Digital Literacy and Digital Competence, 9(2), 15–33.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • O’Donnell, M. (2006). Blogging as pedagogic practice: Artefact and ecology. Asia Pacific Media Educator, 1(17), 5–19.

    Google Scholar 

  • O’Donnell, M. (in press). Transformative digital pedagogy: Reimagining connection, collaboration and design, In R. Lawson, M. O’Donnell & E. Leinonen (Eds.), Developing undergraduate curriculum. London: Springer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Oliver, M. (2013). Learning technology: Theorising the tools we study. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(1), 31–43.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Price, L., & Kirkwood, A. (2014). Using technology for teaching and learning in higher education: A critical review of the role of evidence in informing practice. Higher Education Research & Development, 33(3), 549–564.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Säljö, R. (2010). Digital tools and challenges to institutional traditions of learning: Technologies, social memory and the performative nature of learning. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 26(1), 53–64.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Sample, M. (2012, July 3). A Better Blogging Assignment [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://www.chronicle.com/blogs/profhacker/a-better-blogging-assignment/41127.

  • Sample, M. (2010, August 14). Pedagogy and the Class Blog [Blog post]. Retrieved from http://www.samplereality.com/2009/08/14/pedagogy-and-the-class-blog/.

  • Schön, D. A. (1987). Jossey-Bass higher education series. Educating the reflective practitioner: Toward a new design for teaching and learning in the professions. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sim, J. W. S., & Hew, K. F. (2010). The use of weblogs in higher education settings: A review of empirical research. Educational Research Review, 5(2), 151–163.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Sørensen, B. H., & Levinsen, K. T. (2014). Digital production and students as learning designers. Designs for Learning, 7(1), 54–73.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Sørensen, B. H., & Levinsen, K. T. (2015). Powerful practices in digital learning processes. Electronic Journal of E-learning, 13(4), 291–301.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tai, J., Ajjawi, R., Boud, D., Dawson, P., & Panadero, E. (2018). Developing evaluative judgement: Enabling students to make decisions about the quality of work. Higher Education, 76(3), 467–481.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Teaching UNSW Sydney. (2017). Assessment Toolkit: Assessing with Blogs. Retrieved from https://teaching.unsw.edu.au/assessing-blogs

  • Timmis, S., Broadfoot, P., Sutherland, R., & Oldfield, A. (2016). Rethinking assessment in a digital age: Opportunities, challenges and risks. British Educational Research Journal, 42(3), 454–476.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Tuck, J. (2018). Academics engaging with student writing: Working at the higher education Textface. London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • van Laar, E., van Deursen, A. J., van Dijk, J. A., & de Haan, J. (2017). The relation between 21st-century skills and digital skills: A systematic literature review. Computers in Human Behavior, 72, 577–588.

    Article  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Marcus O’Donnell .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and permissions

Copyright information

© 2020 Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Check for updates. Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

O’Donnell, M. (2020). Assessment as and of Digital Practice: Building Productive Digital Literacies. In: Bearman, M., Dawson, P., Ajjawi, R., Tai, J., Boud, D. (eds) Re-imagining University Assessment in a Digital World. The Enabling Power of Assessment, vol 7. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-41956-1_9

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-41956-1_9

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-41955-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-41956-1

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)

Publish with us

Policies and ethics