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Business Model Framework: Operational Considerations

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Part of the SpringerBriefs in Business book series (BRIEFSBUSINESS)

Abstract

There are many operational considerations in establishing and running an effective technology transfer office. For business model framework operational considerations, we focus on policies and procedures, technology transfer mechanisms, evaluation, and outcomes. The culture and ethos for commercialisation and researcher motivation is also explored and how this can shape technology transfer activities. We conclude with some lessons that focus on taking a strategic approach using key issues, factors for success, and facilitating factors.

Keywords

  • Technology transfer
  • TTOs
  • Researcher motivation
  • Culture
  • Policies
  • Mechanisms

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-41946-2_4
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Cunningham, J.A., Harney, B., Fitzgerald, C. (2020). Business Model Framework: Operational Considerations. In: Effective Technology Transfer Offices. SpringerBriefs in Business. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-41946-2_4

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