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Technology Transfer Offices: Roles, Activities, and Responsibilities

Part of the SpringerBriefs in Business book series (BRIEFSBUSINESS)

Abstract

Technology transfer offices’ roles, activities, and responsibilities form the basis for an effective technology transfer business model framework. Taking a historical context TTOs main roles were namely switchboard services, network development, and technology transfer and managing IP activities. However, the TTO role, activities and responsibilities have expanded to meet increasing internal and external pressures. To this end, we outline some of the multiple responsibilities of TTOs and conclude by exploring the development of expertise that is now required.

Keywords

  • TTOs
  • Technology transfer
  • Skills
  • Activities
  • Roles
  • Responsibilities
  • Mission statements

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Notes

  1. 1.

    http://www.progresstt.eu

  2. 2.

    Based on EIMS (1995), Scott et al. (2001) and sample job descriptions from Georgetown University provided by Dr. Martin Mullins and other secondary source data.

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Cunningham, J.A., Harney, B., Fitzgerald, C. (2020). Technology Transfer Offices: Roles, Activities, and Responsibilities. In: Effective Technology Transfer Offices. SpringerBriefs in Business. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-41946-2_1

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