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Front-End Forensics: An Integrated Forensic Intelligence Model

Part of the Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications book series (ASTSA)

Abstract

Forensic science has the ability and capacity to be an active participant in investigations, rather than its traditional passive role. Too often, the evidence is collected, submitted to the laboratory, and the investigators wait for results, creating a lag between when the information is needed and when it is made available. Obstacles to forensic service providers being actively involved in investigations include organizational cultural norms, operational resources, sworn and civilian human resource issues, and media-driven expectations of outcomes. While traditional intelligence analysis is forecasting, forensic science and criminal investigations are reconstructive and this alters which methods can be and how to improve investigations. What has been characterized as forensic intelligence in the literature is largely forensic support to crime analysis. The benefits to using actual forensic intelligence actively in investigations by shifting forensic results, even if preliminary, to the front-end of the criminal justice system, are reduced wrongful arrests and convictions, more efficient use of policing resources, and stronger cases for adjudication. An integrated forensic intelligence model (IFIM) is offered as a roadmap to creating a sustained professional culture of forensic intelligence.

Keywords

  • Intelligence
  • Forensics
  • Forecasting
  • Policing

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Notes

  1. 1.

    https://www.dni.gov/index.php/what-we-do/what-is-intelligence

  2. 2.

    The Continental Congress created the Committee of Secret Correspondence in 1775 to collect intelligence from people in England, Ireland, and Europe to help in the war effort. https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Franklin/01-22-02-0167

  3. 3.

    California, Hawaii, Indiana, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Texas. Almost all state forensic laboratories (99%) are accredited.

  4. 4.

    https://www.parliament.uk/forensic-science-lords-inquiry

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Correspondence to Max M. Houck .

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Houck, M.M. (2020). Front-End Forensics: An Integrated Forensic Intelligence Model. In: Fox, B., Reid, J., Masys, A. (eds) Science Informed Policing. Advanced Sciences and Technologies for Security Applications. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-41287-6_8

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-41287-6_8

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