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United States Jewish Population, 2019

Part of the American Jewish Year Book book series (AJYB,volume 119)

Abstract

This chapter examines the size, geographic distribution, and selected characteristics of the Jewish population of the US. Section 5.1 addresses the procedures employed to estimate the Jewish population of more than 900 local Jewish communities and parts thereof. Section 5.2 presents the major changes in local Jewish population estimates since last year’s Year Book. Section 5.3 presents a brief migration history of American Jews and examines population estimates for the country as a whole, each state, the 4 US Census Regions, the 9 US Census Divisions, the 21 largest US Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs), the 21 largest Combined Statistical Areas (CSAs), and the 52 Jewish Federation service areas with 20,000 or more Jews. Section 5.4 examines changes in the size and geographic distribution of the Jewish population at national, state, and regional scales from 1980 to 2019. Section 5.5 presents a description of the Detroit Jewish community based on the 2018 Detroit Jewish community study. Section 5.6 presents comparisons of Jewish communities on political party identification and voter registration. Section 5.7 presents an atlas of local American Jewish communities, including a national map of Jews by county and 14 regional and state maps of Jewish communities.

Keywords

  • Unites States
  • Jewish population
  • Detroit
  • Political party

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Fig. 5.1

Notes

  1. 1.

    “The best guidance to this complicated field [Jewish demography] is to be found in the annual volumes of the American Jewish Year Book, which publishes analytical articles, summaries of surveys of Jewish population, and estimates of Jewish population by state and community” (Glazer 1989/1972/1957, p. 189).

  2. 2.

    The term “Jews of Color” refers to individual Jews who may possess African, Asian, Hispanic or Latinx, or Native American heritage and derive their Jewish identity by having been raised as Jews or by conversion. Ironically, in the early part of the twentieth century, American Jews were regarded as less than “white” (Brodkin 1998) because their “Yiddishkeit” made them different.

  3. 3.

    We would like to thank Laurence Kotler-Berkowitz, Senior Director, Research and Analysis and Director, Berman Jewish DataBank at The Jewish Federations of North America and Bruce A. Phillips, Professor of Sociology and Jewish Communal Service at Hebrew Union College for reviewing this section on Jews of Color. We also thank Joshua Comenetz, Population Mapping Consultant, for his review of the entire chapter.

  4. 4.

    The 12%–15% mostly relies on the estimate made by the American Jewish Population Project (Kelman et al. 2019).

  5. 5.

    The NSRI was part of the 1990 National Jewish Population Survey. Note that the data from all three national surveys are for the respondent only so as to make the results comparable among the three studies. Also, all three studies used a random digit dialing procedure and did not employ mailing lists. (Mailing lists might tend to underestimate Jews of Color.) Note as well that only asking population group questions of respondents does not significantly underestimate a population group. In the Miami (2015a) local Jewish community study (which asked Hispanic and Sephardic status of all adults in the household, but not race), 13% of Jewish respondents were Hispanic, compared to 15% of all Jewish adults. For Sephardic Jews, the percentages were 16% and 17%, respectively.

  6. 6.

    Not only did the percentage of Jews who are Jews of Color not change significantly since 1990, neither has the number. In part, because of the influx of Jews from the former Soviet Union and the increase of young ultra-Orthodox, who are both quite unlikely to be Jews of Color, the number of US Jews has increased from 5,981,000 in 1990 to the current 6,968,000 in 2019. Thus, in both years (because the estimate of the percentage of Jews of Color decreased from 7% to 6% from 1990 to 2013 and the number of Jews increased by about one million), the number of Jews of Color has been relatively stable at about 420,000. Note that, in all years, we are assuming that the percentage of Jews of Color among children age 0–17 is about the same as among Jewish adults.

  7. 7.

    The possibility of conversion of Persons of Color to Judaism in large numbers seems unlikely, as the US becomes increasingly secular (Pew Research Center 2013) and because Judaism is not a proselytizing faith. On the other hand, as the diversity of the country increases, the number of Jews of Color could increase.

  8. 8.

    See The Jewish Community Study of New York: 2011, Special Study of Nonwhite, Hispanic, and Multiracial Jewish Households at www.jewishdatabank.org.

  9. 9.

    The Statement reads: “The Greater Miami Jewish Federation strives to create a caring, inclusive and united community rooted in Jewish values and traditions. We embrace and value differences, such as ethnicity and national origin, religious denomination and spiritual practice, race, age, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, socio-economic levels and mental and physical ability.”

  10. 10.

    For a description of some earlier efforts at estimating Jewish population in the US, see Kosmin, Ritterband, and Scheckner (1988), Marcus (1990), and Rabin (2017). See also Dashefsky and Sheskin (2012).

  11. 11.

    See Sheskin (1998), Abrahamson (1986), Kaganoff (1996), Kosmin and Waterman (1989), and Lazerwitz (1986). The fact that about 8%–12% of US Jews, despite rising intermarriage rates, continue to have one of 36 Distinctive Jewish Names (Berman, Caplan, Cohen, Epstein, Feldman, Freedman, Friedman, Goldberg, Goldman, Goldstein, Goodman, Greenberg, Gross, Grossman, Jacobs, Jaffe, Kahn, Kaplan, Katz, Kohn, Levin, Levine, Levinson, Levy, Lieberman, Rosen, Rosenberg, Rosenthal, Rubin, Schwartz, Shapiro, Siegel, Silverman, Stern, Weinstein, and Weiss) facilitates making reasonable estimates of the Jewish population. See also Mateos (2014) on the uses of ethnic names in general.

  12. 12.

    For an example, see footnote 4 in Sheskin and Dashefsky (2008).

  13. 13.

    Note that while we have classified DJN and “different methodology” methods as Scientific, the level of accuracy of such methods is well below that of the RDD or ABS methodology. Most studies using a “different methodology” have made concerted efforts to enumerate the known Jewish population via merging membership lists and surveying known Jewish households. An estimate of the unaffiliated Jewish population is then added to the affiliated population.

  14. 14.

    For methods for estimating the ultra-Orthodox population from US Census data, see Comenetz (2006).

  15. 15.

    Among US Jewish communities, more than 140 are served by organizations known as Jewish Federations. The Jewish Federations of North America is the central coordinating body for the local Jewish Federations.A Jewish Federation is a central fundraising and coordinating body for the area it serves. It provides funds for various Jewish social service agencies, volunteer programs, educational institutions and programs, and related organizations, with allocations being made to the various beneficiary agencies by a planning or allocation committee. A local Jewish Federation’s broad purposes are to provide “human services (generally, but not exclusively, to the local Jewish community) and to fund programs designed to build commitment to the Jewish people locally, in Israel, and throughout the world.” In recent years, funding programs to assure Jewish continuity have become a major focus of Jewish Federation efforts.Most planning in the US Jewish community is done either nationally (by The Jewish Federations of North America and other national organizations) or locally by Jewish Federations. Data for local Jewish Federation service areas is essential to the US Jewish community and to planning both locally and nationally (Sheskin 2009, 2013).

  16. 16.

    The number of Jews in Florida in 2019 excludes Jews in part-year households (“snowbirds”). The historical record does not indicate the portion of the population that was part year in 1980.

  17. 17.

    Only the Westport, Weston, Wilton, Norwalk areas of Upper Fairfield County were included in the survey in 2000.

  18. 18.

    Palm Beach County consists of two Jewish communities: The South Palm Beach community includes Greater Boca Raton and Greater Delray Beach. The West Palm Beach community includes all other areas of Palm Beach County from Boynton Beach north to the Martin County line.

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Acknowledgments

The authors thank the following individuals and organizations:

  1. 1.

    The Jewish Federations of North America (JFNA) and former staff members at its predecessor organizations (United Jewish Communities and Council of Jewish Federations), including Jim Schwartz, Jeffrey Scheckner, and Barry Kosmin, who authored the AJYB US Jewish population chapters from 1986 to 2003. Some population estimates in this report are still based on their efforts;

  2. 2.

    Laurence Kotler-Berkowitz, Senior Director of Research and Analysis and Director of the Berman Jewish DataBank at The Jewish Federations of North America;

  3. 3.

    Amy Lawton and Maria Reger, Editorial Assistants, Pamela Weathers, Program Assistant, and Kezia Mann, Student Administrative Assistant, all at the Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life at the University of Connecticut, for their excellent assistance;

  4. 4.

    Chris Hanson and the University of Miami Department of Geography’s Geographic Information Systems Laboratory for assistance with the maps; and

  5. 5.

    Joshua Comenetz for the new estimates for Jewish population in Hasidic communities.

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Correspondence to Ira M. Sheskin .

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Appendix

Appendix

This Appendix presents detailed data on the US Jewish population in four columns:

Date Column. This column provides the date of the latest Scientific Estimate or Informant/Internet Estimate for each geographic area. This chapter’s former authors provided only a range of years (pre-1997 or 1997–2001) for the last informant contact. For estimates after 2001, exact dates are shown. For communities for which the date is more recent than the date of the latest scientific study shown in boldface type in the Geographic Area column, the study estimate has been confirmed or updated by an Informant/Internet Estimate subsequent to the scientific study.

Geographic Area Column. This column provides estimates for more than 900 Jewish communities (of 100 Jews or more) and geographic subareas thereof. The number of estimates for each state ranges from three in Delaware, North Dakota, Oklahoma, and South Dakota to more than 75 in California (91), New York (87), and Florida (77). Many estimates are for Jewish Federation service areas. Where possible, these service areas are disaggregated into smaller geographic subareas. For example, separate estimates are provided for such places as West Bloomfield, Michigan (part of the service area of the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Detroit) and Boynton Beach (Florida) (part of the service area of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County). This column also indicates the source of each estimate:

  1. 1.

    Scientific Estimates. Estimates in boldface type are based on scientific studies, which, unless otherwise indicated, are Random Digit Dial (RDD) studies. The boldface date in the Geographic Area column indicates the year in which the field work was conducted. Superscripts are used to indicate the type of Scientific Estimate when it is not RDD:

    1. (a)

      indicates a Distinctive Jewish Name (DJN) study

    2. (b)

      indicates a DJN study used to update a previous RDD study (first date is for the RDD study, second date is for the DJN-based update)

    3. (c)

      indicates the use of US Census data

    4. (d)

      indicates a scientific study using a different methodology (neither RDD nor DJN)

    5. (e)

      indicates a scientific study using a different methodology (neither RDD nor DJN) that is used to update a previous RDD study (first date is for the RDD study, second date is for the other scientific study)

  2. 2.

    Informant/Internet Estimates. Estimates for communities not shown in boldface type are generally based on Informant/Internet Estimates

# of Jews. This column shows estimates of the number of Jews for each area or subarea, exclusive of part-year Jews.

Part-Year. For communities for which the information is available, this column presents estimates of the number of Jews in part-year households. Part-year households are defined as households who live in a community for 3–7 months of the year. Note that part-year households are probably important components of other communities but we have no documentation of such.

Jews in part-year households form an essential component of some Jewish communities, as many join synagogues and donate to Jewish Federations in the communities in which they live part time. This is particularly true in Florida, and, to a lesser extent, in other states with many retirees. Presenting the information in this way allows the reader to gain a better perspective on the size of Jewish communities with significant part-year populations, without double-counting the part-year Jewish population in the totals. Note that Jews in part-year households are reported as such in the community that is most likely their “second home.”

Excel Spreadsheet. The Excel spreadsheet used to create this Appendix and the other tables in this chapter is available at www.jewishdatabank.org. This spreadsheet also includes information on about 250 Other Places with Jewish populations of less than 100, which are aggregated and shown as the last entry for many of the states in this Appendix. The spreadsheet also contains Excel versions of the other tables in this chapter as well as a table showing some of the major changes since last year’s Year Book

Communities with estimated Jewish population of 100 or more, 2019
Date Geographic Area # of Jews Part-Year
  Alabama   
2017 Auburn 100  
2019 Birmingham (Jefferson County) 6300  
2014 Dothan 200  
2016 Huntsville 750  
2014 Mobile (Baldwin & Mobile Counties) 1350  
2014 Montgomery 1100  
2008 Tuscaloosa 200  
  Other Places 325  
  Total Alabama 10,325  
  Alaska   
2008 Anchorage (Anchorage Borough) 5000  
2013 Fairbanks (Fairbanks North Star Borough) 275  
2012 Juneau 300  
2016 Kenai Peninsula 100  
1997–2001 Other Places 75  
  Total Alaska 5750  
  Arizona   
2002 Cochise County (2002)a 450  
2017 Flagstaff (Coconino County) 1000 500
1997–2001 Lake Havasu City 200  
2019 Northwest Valley (Glendale-Peoria-Sun City) (2002) 10,900  
2019 Phoenix (2002) 23,600  
2019 Northeast Valley (Scottsdale) (2002) 34,500  
2019 Tri Cities Valley (Ahwatukee-Chandler-Gilbert-Mesa-Tempe) (2002) 13,900  
2019 Greater Phoenix Total (2002) 82,900  
2008 Prescott 300  
2002 Santa Cruz County (2002)a 100  
2008 Sedona 300 50
2019 West-Northwest (2002) 3450  
2019 Northeast (2002) 7850  
2019 Central (2002) 7150  
2019 Southeast (2002) 2500  
2019 Green Valley (2002) 450  
2019 Jewish Federation of Southern Arizona-Tucson(Pima County) Total (2002) 21,400 1000
2016 Other Places 75  
  Total Arizona 106,725 1550
  Arkansas   
2016 Bentonville 175  
2008 Fayetteville 175  
2001 Hot Springs 150  
2010 Little Rock 1500  
2007 Other Places 225  
  Total Arkansas 2225  
  California   
1997–2001 Antelope Valley (Lancaster-Palmdale in LA County) 3000  
1997–2001 Bakersfield (Kern County) 1600  
1997–2001 Chico-Oroville-Paradise (Butte County) 750  
1997–2001 Eureka (Humboldt County) 1000  
2011 Fresno (Fresno County) (2011)a 3500  
2016 Grass Valley (Nevada County) 300  
2018 Long Beach (Cerritos-Hawaiian Gardens-Lakewood-Signal Hill in Los Angeles County & Buena Park-Cypress-La 23,750  
  Palma-Los Alamitos-Rossmoor-Seal Beach in Orange County)   
2009 Airport Marina (1997) 22,140  
2009 Beach Cities (1997) 17,270  
2009 Beverly Hills (1997) 20,500  
2009 Burbank-Glendale (1997) 19,840  
2009 Central (1997) 11,600  
2009 Central City (1997) 4710  
2009 Central Valley (1997) 27,740  
2009 Cheviot-Beverlywood (1997) 29,310  
2009 Culver City (1997) 9110  
2009 Eastern Belt (1997) 3900  
2009 Encino-Tarzana (1997) 50,290  
2009 Fairfax (1997) 54,850  
2009 High Desert (1997) 10,920  
2009 Hollywood (1997) 10,390  
2009 Malibu-Palisades (1997) 27,190  
2009 North Valley (1997) 36,760  
2009 Palos Verdes Peninsula (1997) 6780  
2009 San Pedro (1997) 5310  
2009 Santa Monica-Venice (1997) 23,140  
2009 Simi-Conejo (1997) 38,470  
2009 Southeast Valley (1997) 28,150  
2009 West Valley (1997) 40,160  
2009 Westwood (1997) 20,670  
2009 Los Angeles (Los Angeles County, excluding parts included in Long Beach,
& southern Ventura County) Total (1997)
519,200  
2010 Mendocino County (Redwood Valley-Ukiah) 600  
1997–2001 Merced County 190  
1997–2001 Modesto (Stanislaus County) 500  
2011 Monterey Peninsula (2011)a 4500  
1997–2001 Murrieta Hot Springs 550  
2016 Orange County (excluding parts included in Long Beach) 80,000  
2015 Palm Springs (1998) 2500 900
2015 Cathedral City-Rancho Mirage (1998) 3300 5900
2015 Palm Desert-Sun City (1998) 3700 1900
2015 East Valley (Bermuda-Dunes-Indian Wells-Indio-La Quinta) (1998) 1200 250
2015 North Valley (Desert Hot Springs-North Palm Springs-Thousand Palms) (1998) 300 50
2015 Palm Springs (Coachella Valley) Total (1998) 11,000 9000
2010 Redlands 1000  
2016 Redding (Shasta County) 150  
2016 Riverside-Corona-Moreno Valley 2000  
1997–2001 Sacramento (El Dorado, Placer, Sacramento, & Yolo Counties) (1993) (except Lake Tahoe area)d 21,000  
2015 Salinas 300  
2010 San Bernardino-Fontana 1000  
2016 North County Coastal (2003) 27,000  
2016 North County Inland (2003) 20,300  
2016 Greater East San Diego (2003) 21,200  
2016 La Jolla-Mid-Coastal (2003) 16,200  
2016 Central San Diego (2003) 13,700  
2016 South County (2003) 1600  
2016 San Diego (San Diego County) Total (2003) 100,000  
2018 Alameda County (2018) 63,100  
2018 Contra Costa County (2018) 55,900  
2018 Marin County (2018) 37,300  
2018 Napa County (2018) 2100  
2018 San Francisco County (2018) 61,500  
2018 San Mateo County Total (2018) 29,700  
2018 Santa Clara County (part) (2018) 33,800  
2018 Santa Cruz County (2018) 15,100  
2018 Solano County (Vallejo) (2018) 3900  
2018 Sonoma County (Petaluma-Santa Rosa) (2018) 8200  
2018 Jewish Community Federation & Endowment Fund of San Francisco,
the Peninsula, Marin & Sonoma Counties (2018)
310,600  
2019 Jewish Federation of Silicon Valley Total (Parts of Santa Clara County) (San Jose) 39,400  
2018 San Francisco Bay Area Total 350,000  
2018 Santa Clara County (2018) Total 73,200  
1997–2001 San Gabriel & Pomona Valleys (Alta Loma-Chino-Claremont-Cucamonga-La Verne-Montclair-   
  Ontario-Pomona-San Dimas-Upland) 30,000  
2016 San Luis Obispo-Atascadero (San Luis Obispo County) 1000  
2019 Santa Barbara (Santa Barbara County) 8500  
1997–2001 Santa Maria 500  
2016 South Lake Tahoe (El Dorado County) 100  
2016 Stockton 900  
2016 Tahoe Vista 200  
2016 Tulare & Kings Counties (Visalia) 350  
1997–2001 Ventura County (excluding Simi-Conejo of Los Angeles) 15,000  
2016 Victorville 100  
1997–2001 Other Places 450  
  Total California 1,182,990 9000
  Colorado   
2014 Aspen 750  
2010 Colorado Springs (2010)a 2500  
2008 Crested Butte 175  
2016 Durango 200  
2018 Denver (2007) 32,500  
2018 South Metro (2007) 22,400  
2018 Boulder (2007) 14,600  
2018 North & West Metro (2007) 12,900  
2018 Aurora (2007) 7500  
2018 North & East Metro (2007) 5100  
2018 Greater Denver (Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Broomfield, Denver, Douglas,
& Jefferson Counties) Total (2007)
95,000  
2013 Fort Collins-Greeley-Loveland 1500  
2016 Grand Junction (Mesa County) 300  
2015 Pueblo 150  
2016 Steamboat Springs 300  
Pre-1997 Telluride 125  
2011 Vail-Breckenridge-Eagle (Eagle & Summit Counties) (2011)a 1500  
1997–2001 Other Places 100  
  Total Colorado 102,600  
  Connecticut   
Pre-1997 Colchester-Lebanon 300  
2014 Danbury (Bethel-Brookfield-New Fairfield-New Milford-Newtown-Redding-Ridgefield-Sherman) 5000  
2019 Greenwich 7500  
2009 Core Area (Bloomfield-Hartford-West Hartford) (2000) 15,800  
2009 Farmington Valley (Avon-Burlington-Canton-East Granby-Farmington-Granby-New Hartford-Simsbury) (2000) 6400  
2009 East of the River (East Hartford-East Windsor-Enfield-Glastonbury-Manchester-South Windsor in Hartford County & Andover-Bolton-Coventry-Ellington-Hebron-Somers-Tolland-Vernon 4800  
  in Tolland County) (2000)   
2009 South of Hartford (Berlin-Bristol-New Britain-Newington-Plainville-Rocky Hill-Southington- 5000  
  Wethersfield in Hartford County, Plymouth in Litchfield County, Cromwell-Durham-Haddam-   
  Middlefield-Middletown in Middlesex County, & Meriden in New Haven County) (2000)   
2009 Suffield-Windsor-Windsor Locks (2000) 800  
2009 Jewish Federation of Greater Hartford Total (2000) 32,800  
2016 The East (Centerbrook-Chester-Clinton-Deep River-Ivoryton-Killingworth-Old Saybrook- 4900  
  Westbrook in Middlesex County & Branford-East Haven-Essex-Guilford-Madison-
North Branford-Northford in New Haven County) (2010)
  
2016 The West (Ansonia-Derby-Milford-Seymour-West Haven in New Haven County &
Shelton in Fairfield County) (2010)
3200  
2016 The Central Area (Bethany-New Haven-Orange-Woodbridge) (2010) 8800  
2016 Hamden (2010) 3200  
2016 The North (Cheshire-North Haven-Wallingford) (2010) 2900  
2016 Jewish Federation of Greater New Haven Total (2010) 23,000  
1997–2001 New London-Norwich (central & southern New London County) 3800  
2010 Southbury (Beacon Falls-Middlebury-Naugatuck-Oxford-Prospect-Waterbury-Wolcott in New Haven 4500  
  County & Washington-Watertown in Litchfield County) (2010)a   
2010 Southern Litchfield County (Bethlehem-Litchfield-Morris-Roxbury-Thomaston-Woodbury) (2010)a 3500  
2010 Jewish Federation of Western Connecticut Total (2010)a 8000  
2009 Stamford (Darien-New Canaan) 12,000  
2006 Storrs-Columbia & parts of Tolland County 500  
1997–2001 Torrington 600  
2000 Westport (2000) 5000  
2000 Weston (2000) 1850  
2000 Wilton (2000) 1550  
2000 Norwalk (2000) 3050  
2014 Bridgeport (Easton-Fairfield-Monroe-Stratford-Trumbull) 13,000  
2000 Federation for Jewish Philanthropy in Upper Fairfield County Total (2000) 24,450  
2006 Windham-Willimantic & parts of Windham County 400  
  Total Connecticut 118,350  
  Delaware   
2018 Kent & Sussex Counties (Dover) (1995, 2006)b 3200  
2018 Newark (1995, 2006)b 4300  
2018 Wilmington (1995, 2006)b 7600  
  Total Delaware (1995, 2006)b 15,100  
  Washington, DC   
2017 Total District of Columbia (2003) 57,300  
2017 Lower Montgomery County (Maryland) (2017) 87,000  
2017 Upper Montgomery County (Maryland) (2017) 18,400  
2017 Prince George’s County (Maryland) (2017) 11,400  
2017 North-Central Northern Virginia (2017) 24,500  
2017 Central Northern Virginia (2017) 23,100  
2017 East Northern Virginia (2017) 54,400  
2017 West-Northern Virginia (2017) 19,400  
2017 Jewish Federation of Greater Washington Total (2017) 295,500  
  Florida   
2016 Beverly Hills-Crystal River (Citrus County) 350  
2016 Brevard County (Melbourne) 4000  
2016 Clermont (Lake County) 200  
2019 Fort Myers-Arcadia-Port Charlotte-Punta Gorda (Charlotte, De Soto, & Northern Lee Counties) 7000  
2017 Bonita Springs-Southern Lee Countyd 500 500
2017 Jewish Federation of Lee & Charlotte Counties (Total) 7500 500
1997–2001 Fort Pierce (northern St. Lucie County) 1060  
2019 Fort Walton Beach 400  
2017 Gainesville 2500  
2017 Jacksonville Core Area (2002, 2015)e 8800  
2017 The Beaches (Atlantic Beach-Jacksonville Beach-Neptune Beach-Ponte Vedra Beach) (2002, 2015)e 1900  
2017 Other Places in Clay, Duval, Nassau, & St. Johns Counties (including St. Augustine) (2002, 2015)e 2200  
2017 Jacksonville Total (2002, 2015)e 12,900 100
2016 Key Largo 100  
2014 Key West 1000  
  Total Monroe County 1100  
Pre-1997 Lakeland (Polk County) 1000  
2019 Marco Islandd 400 600
2019 Other Collier County (Naples)d 3930 2600
2019 Jewish Federation of Collier County (Naples) (2017)d 4330 3200
1997–2001 Ocala (Marion County) 500  
2016 Oxford (Sumter County) 2000  
2017 North Orlando (Seminole County & southern Volusia County) (1993, 2010)b 11,900 300
2017 Central Orlando (Maitland-parts of Orlando-Winter Park) (1993, 2010)b 10,600 100
2017 South Orlando (parts of Orlando & northern Osceola County) (1993, 2010) b 8100 100
2017 Orlando Total (1993, 2010)b 30,600 500
2016 Panama City (Bay County) 100  
2015 Pensacola (Escambia & Santa Rosa Counties) 800  
2017 North Pinellas (Clearwater) (2017) 8800 800
2017 Central Pinellas (Largo) (2017) 2300 500
2017 South Pinellas (St. Petersburg) (2017) 10,950 200
2017 Pinellas County (St. Petersburg) Subtotal (2017) 22,050 1500
2017 Pasco County (New Port Richey) (2017) 4450  
2012 Hernando County (Spring Hill) 350  
2017 Jewish Federation of Florida’s Gulf Coast Total (2017) 26,850 1500
2015 Sarasota (2001) 8600 1500
2015 Longboat Key (2001) 1000 1500
2015 Bradenton (Manatee County) (2001) 1750 200
2015 Venice (2001) 850 100
2015 Sarasota-Manatee Total (2001) 12,200 3300
2018 East Boca (2018) 24,400 3700
2018 Central Boca (2018) 32,200 9900
2018 West Boca (2018) 18,600 400
2018 Boca Raton Subtotal (2018) 75,200 14,000
2018 Delray Beach (2005) 38,400 8500
2018 South Palm Beach Subtotal (2018) 113,600 22,500
2018 Boynton Beach (2018) 30,400 5500
2018 Lake Worth (2018) 25,600 2500
2018 Town of Palm Beach (2018) 1700 1400
2018 West Palm Beach (2018) 11,000 1300
2018 Wellington-Royal Palm Beach (2018) 9600 1100
2018 North Palm Beach-Palm Beach Gardens-Jupiter (2018) 26,400 10,700
2018 West Palm Beach Subtotal (2018) 104,700 22,500
2018 Palm Beach County Total (2018) 218,300 45,000
2018 North Dade Core East (Aventura-Golden Beach-parts of North Miami Beach) (2014) 36,000 2200
2018 North Dade Core West (parts of North Miami Beach-Ojus) (2014) 18,500 200
2018 Other North Dade (parts of City of Miami) (north of Flagler Street) (2014) 9500 100
2018 North Dade Subtotal (2014) 64,000 2500
2018 West Kendall (2014) 17,500 200
2018 East Kendall (parts of Coral Gables-Pinecrest-South Miami) (2014) 6800 100
2018 Northeast South Dade (Key Biscayne-parts of City of Miami) (2014) 11,900 400
2018 South Dade Subtotal (2014) 36,200 700
2018 North Beach (Bal Harbour-Bay Harbor Islands-Indian Creek Village-Surfside) (2014) 4300 400
2018 Middle Beach (parts of City of Miami Beach) (2014) 9800 500
2018 South Beach (parts of City of Miami Beach) (2014) 4800 100
2018 The Beaches Subtotal (2014) 18,900 1000
2018 Miami-Dade County Total (2014) 119,000 4200
2019 East (Fort Lauderdale) (2016) 9400 400
2019 North Central (Century Village-Coconut Creek-Margate-Palm Aire-Wynmoor) (2016) 8000 1800
2019 Northwest (Coral Springs-Parkland) (2016) 27,200 1200
2019 Southeast (Hallandale-Hollywood) (2016) 24,000 1000
2019 Southwest (Cooper City-Davie-Pembroke Pines-Weston) (2016) 39,400 300
2019 West Central (Lauderdale Lakes-North Lauderdale-Plantation-Sunrise-Tamarac) (2016) 35,700 600
2019 Broward County Total (2016) 143,700 5300
  Southeast Florida (Broward, Miami-Dade, & Palm Beach Counties) Total 481,000 54,500
2016 Sebring (Highlands County) 150  
2019 Stuart (Martin County) (2018) 8000 200
2004 Southern St. Lucie County (Port St. Lucie) (1999, 2004)b 2900  
2019 Stuart-Port St. Lucie (Martin-St. Lucie) Total (1999, 2004, 2018)b 10,900 900
2015 Tallahassee (2010)a 2800  
2017 Tampa (Hillsborough County) (2010)a 23,000  
2016 Vero Beach (Indian River County) 1000  
2017 Volusia (Daytona Beach) (excluding southern parts included in North Orlando) & Flagler Counties   
  Jewish Federation of Volusia and Flagler Counties 4500  
Pre-1997 Winter Haven 300  
2019 Other Places 25  
  Total Florida 643,895 68,200
  Georgia   
2009 Albany 200  
2012 Athens 750  
2012 Intown (2006) 28,900  
2012 North Metro Atlanta (2006) 28,300  
2012 East Cobb Expanded (2006) 18,400  
2012 Sandy Springs-Dunwoody (2006) 15,700  
2012 Gwinnett-East Perimeter (2006) 14,000  
2012 North & West Perimeter (2006) 9000  
2012 South (2006) 5500  
2012 Atlanta Total (2006) 119,800  
2019 Augusta (Burke, Columbia, & Richmond Counties) 1600  
2009 Brunswick 120  
2015 Columbus 600  
2009 Dahlonega 150  
2015 Macon 750  
2010 Rome 100  
2016 Savannah (Chatham County) 4300  
2009 Valdosta 100  
2009 Other Places 250  
  Total Georgia 128,720  
  Hawaii   
2012 Hawaii (Hilo) 100  
2011 Kauai 300  
2008 Maui 1500 1000
2010 Oahu (Honolulu) (2010)a 5200  
  Total Hawaii 7100 1000
  Idaho   
2015 Boise (Ada, Caldwell, Weiser, Nampa, & Boise Counties) 1500  
2014 Ketchum-Sun Valley-Hailey-Bellevue 350  
2014 Moscow (Palouse) 100  
2009 Pocatello 150  
  Other Places 25  
  Total Idaho 2125  
  Illinois   
2015 Bloomington-Normal 500  
2015 Champaign-Urbana (Champaign County) 1400  
2019 Decatur 100  
2019 City North (The Loop to Rogers Park, including North Lakefront) (2010) 70,150  
2019 Rest of Chicago (parts of City of Chicago not included in City North) (2010) 19,100  
2019 Near North Suburbs (Suburbs contiguous to City of Chicago from Evanston to Park Ridge) (2010) 64,600  
2019 North/Far North (Wilmette to Wisconsin, west to include Northbrook, Glenview, Deerfield, etc.) (2010) 56,300  
2019 Northwest Suburbs (includes northwest Cook County, parts of Lake County, & McHenry County) (2010) 51,950  
2019 Western Suburbs (DuPage & Kane Counties & Oak Park-River Forest in Cook County) (2010) 23,300  
2019 Southern Suburbs (south & southwest Cook County beyond the City to Indiana & Will County) (2010) 6400  
2019 Chicago (Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, McHenry, & Will Counties) Total (2010) 291,800  
1997–2001 DeKalb 180  
2016 Lindenhurst (Lake County) 100  
2019 Peoria 800  
2019 Quad Cities-Illinois portion (Moline-Rock Island) (1990)d 175  
2019 Quad Cities-Iowa portion (Davenport & surrounding Scott County) (1990)d 275  
2005 Quad Cities Total (1990)d 450  
2015 Quincy 100  
2019 Rockford-Freeport (Boone, Stephenson, & Winnebago Counties) 650  
2015 Southern Illinois (Alton-Belleville-Benton-Carbondale-Centralia-Collinsville-East St. Louis-Herrin-Marion) 500  
2019 Springfield-Decatur (Morgan, & Sangamon Counties) 830  
  Other Places 325  
2015 Jewish Federation of Southern Illinois, Southeast Missouri and Western Kentucky
(Alton-Belleville-Benton-Carbondale-Centralia-Collinsville-East St. Louis-Herrin-Marion in Southern Illinois,
Cape Girardeau-Farmington-Sikeston in Southeast Missouri, & Paducah in Western Kentucky) Total
650  
  Total Illinois 297,735  
  Indiana   
2017 Bloomington 1000  
2017 Evansville 500  
1997–2001 Fort Wayne 900  
2012 Gary-Northwest Indiana (Lake & Porter Counties) 2000  
2017 North of Core (2017) 9200  
2017 Core Area (2017) 6100  
2017 South of Core (2017) 2600  
2017 Jewish Federation of Greater Indianapolis Total (2017) 17,900  
2014 Lafayette 400  
2015 Michigan City (La Porte County) 300  
1997–2001 Muncie 120  
2017 Richmond 100  
2019 South Bend-Mishawaka-Elkhart (Elkhart & St. Joseph Counties) 1650  
2019 Benton Harbor (Michigan) 150  
2019 Jewish Federation of St. Joseph Valley Total 1800  
2017 Terre Haute (Vigo County) 100  
  Other Places 275  
  Total Indiana 25,245  
  Iowa   
2017 Cedar Rapids 400  
1997–2001 Des Moines-Ames (1956)d 2800  
2014 Fairfield 200  
2017 Iowa City/Coralville (Johnson County) 750  
2017 Postville 150  
2019 Quad Cities-Illinois portion (Moline-Rock Island) (1990)d 175  
2019 Quad Cities-Iowa portion (Davenport & surrounding Scott County) (1990)d 275  
2005 Quad Cities Total (1990)d 450  
2014 Sioux City (Plymouth & Woodbury Counties) 300  
2014 Waterloo (Black Hawk County) 100  
  Other Places 300  
  Total Iowa 5275  
  Kansas   
2016 Kansas City-Kansas portion (Johnson & Wyandotte Counties) (1985)d 16,000  
2016 Kansas City-Missouri portion (1985)d 2000  
2016 Kansas City Total (1985)d 18,000  
2017 Lawrence 300  
2014 Manhattan 175  
2014 Topeka (Shawnee County) 300  
2019 Wichita 625  
2019 Other Places 25  
2019 Mid-Kansas Jewish Federation (Total) 650  
  Total Kansas 17,425  
  Kentucky   
2008 Covington-Newport (2008) 300  
2018 Lexington (Bourbon, Clark, Fayette, Jessamine, Madison, Pulaski, Scott, & Woodford Counties)   
  Jewish Federation of the Bluegrass 2500  
2015 Louisville (Jefferson County) (2006)d 8300  
2013 Other Places 100  
2015 Jewish Federation of Southern Illinois, Southeast Missouri and Western Kentucky
(Alton-Belleville-Benton-Carbondale-Centralia-Collinsville-East St. Louis-Herrin-Marion in Southern Illinois,
Cape Girardeau-Farmington-Sikeston in Southeast Missouri, & Paducah in Western Kentucky) Total
650  
  Total Kentucky 11,200  
  Louisiana   
2017 Alexandria (Allen, Grant, Rapides, Vernon, & Winn Parishes) 300  
2016 Baton Rouge (Ascension, East Baton Rouge, Iberville, Livingston, Pointe Coupee, St. Landry, &West Baton Rouge Parishes) 1500  
2008 Lafayette 200  
2008 Lake Charles 200  
2019 New Orleans (Jefferson & Orleans Parishes) (1984, 2009)e 12,000  
2007 Monroe-Ruston 150  
2007 Shreveport-Bossier 450  
2007 North Louisiana (Bossier & Caddo Parishes) Total 600  
2007 Other Places 100  
  Total Louisiana 14,900  
  Maine   
2007 Androscoggin County (Lewiston-Auburn) (2007)a 600  
2017 Augusta 300  
2017 Bangor 1500  
2007 Oxford County (South Paris) (2007)a 750  
2017 Rockland 300  
2007 Sagadahoc County (Bath) (2007)a 400  
2018 Portland (2007) 4425  
2018 Other Cumberland County (2007) 2350  
2018 York County (2007) 1575  
2018 Southern Maine Total (2007) 8350  
2014 Waterville 225  
  Other Places 125  
  Total Maine 12,550  
  Maryland   
2010 Annapolis (2010)a 3500  
2018 Pikesville (2010) 31,100  
2018 Park Heights-Cheswolde (2010) 13,000  
2018 Owings Mills (2010) 12,100  
2018 Reisterstown (2010) 7000  
2018 Mount Washington (2010) 6600  
2018 Towson-Lutherville-Timonium-Interstate 83 (2010) 5600  
2018 Downtown (2010) 4500  
2018 Guilford-Roland Park (2010) 4100  
2018 Randallstown-Liberty Road (2010) 2900  
2018 Other Baltimore County (2010) 3700  
2018 Carroll County (2010) 2800  
2018 Baltimore Total (2010) 93,400  
2017 Cumberland 275  
2017 Easton (Talbot County) 500  
2017 Frederick (Frederick County) 1200  
2017 Hagerstown (Washington County) 325  
2017 Harford County 1600  
2010 Howard County (Columbia) (2010) 17,200  
2016 Lower Montgomery County (2003) 87,000  
2016 Upper Montgomery County (2003) 18,400  
2016 Prince George’s County (2003) 11,400  
2016 Jewish Federation of Greater Washington Total in Maryland (2003) 116,800  
2017 Ocean City 1000  
2012 Prince Frederick (Calvert County) 100  
2017 Salisbury 400  
2017 Waldorf 200  
2012 South Gate 100  
  Total Maryland 236,600  
  Massachusetts   
2016 Attleboro (2002)a 800  
2016 State of Rhode Island (2002) 18,750  
2016 Jewish Alliance of Greater Rhode Island Total 19,550  
2019 Northern Berkshires (North Adams) (2008)d 600 80
2019 Central Berkshires (Pittsfield) (2008)d 1600 415
2019 Southern Berkshires (Lenox) (2008)d 2100 2255
2019 Berkshires Total (2008)d 4300 2750
2019 Brighton-Brookline-Newton & Contiguous Areas (2015) 70,700  
2019 Cambridge-Somerville-Central Boston (2015) 66,800  
2019 Greater Framingham (2015) 21,100  
2019 Northwestern Suburbs (2015) 11,200  
2019 Greater Sharon (2015) 10,400  
2019 North Shore (2015) 30,000  
2019 Southwestern Suburbs (2015) 5300  
2019 Northern Suburbs (2015) 14,400  
2019 South Area (2015) 18,100  
2019 Boston Total 248,000  
1997–2001 Cape Cod (Barnstable County) 3250  
2017 Fall River 600  
2013 Martha’s Vineyard (Dukes County) 375 200
2005 Andover-Boxford-Dracut-Lawrence-Methuen-North Andover-Tewksbury 3000  
2005 Haverhill 900  
2005 Lowell 2100  
2005 Merrimack Valley Jewish Federation Total 6000  
2014 Nantucket 100 400
2019 New Bedford (Dartmouth-Fairhaven-Mattapoisett) 3000  
1997–2001 Newburyport 280  
2014 Plymouth 1200  
2012 Springfield (Hampden County) (1967)d 6600  
2012 Franklin County (Greenfield) 1100  
2012 Hampshire County (Amherst-Northampton) 6500  
2012 Jewish Federation of Western Massachusetts Total 14,200  
2014 Taunton 400  
2018 Worcester (central Worcester County) (1986) 9000  
2018 South Worcester County (Southbridge-Webster) 500  
2018 North Worcester County (Fitchburg-Gardner-Leominster) 1000  
2018 Jewish Federation of Central Massachusetts (Worcester County) Total 10,500  
  Other Places 75  
  Total Massachusetts 293,080 3,350
  Michigan   
2017 Ann Arbor (Washtenaw County) (2010)a 8000  
2012 Bay City-Saginaw 250  
2016 South Bend-Mishawaka-Elkhart (Elkhart & St. Joseph Counties) (Indiana) 1650  
2016 Benton Harbor-St. Joseph 150  
2016 Jewish Federation of St. Joseph Valley Total 1800  
2019 West Bloomfield (2017) 15,200  
2019 Bloomfield Hills-Birmingham-Franklin (2017) 12,400  
2019 Farmington (2017) 6300  
2019 Oak Park-Huntington Woods (2017) 12,800  
2019 Southfield (2017) 5600  
2019 East Oakland County (2017) 3600  
2019 North Oakland County (2017) 3700  
2019 West Oakland County (2017) 4450  
2019 Wayne County (2017) 5000  
2019 Macomb County (2017) 2700  
2019 Detroit (Macomb, Oakland, & Wayne Counties) Total (2017) 71,750  
2009 Flint (1956)d 1300  
2018 Grand Rapids (Kent County) 2000  
2017 Jackson 200  
2012 Kalamazoo (Kalamazoo County) 1500  
2016 Lansing 1800  
2015 Lenawee & Monroe Counties 200  
2007 Midland 120  
2007 Muskegon (Muskegon County) 210  
2017 Traverse City 150  
2007 Other Places 275  
2015 Jewish Federation of Greater Toledo (Fulton, Lucas, & Wood Counties in Ohio & Lenawee &
Monroe Counties in Michigan) Total
2300  
  Total Michigan 87,905  
  Minnesota   
2015 Duluth (Carlton & St. Louis Counties) 600  
2017 Rochester 400  
2015 City of Minneapolis (2004) 5200  
2015 Inner Ring (2004) 16,100  
2015 Outer Ring (2004) 8000  
2015 Minneapolis (Hennepin County) Subtotal (2004) 29,300  
2019 City of St. Paul (2004, 2010)b 4000  
2019 Southern Suburbs (2004, 2010)b 5300  
2019 Northern Suburbs (2004, 2010)b 600  
2019 St. Paul (Dakota & Ramsey Counties) Subtotal (2004, 2010)b 9900  
  Twin Cities Total 39,200  
2004 Twin Cities Surrounding Counties (Anoka, Carver, Goodhue, Rice, Scott, Sherburne, Washington,   
  & Wright Counties) (2004)a 5300  
  Other Places 100  
  Total Minnesota 45,600  
  Mississippi   
2015 Biloxi-Gulfport 200  
2008 Greenville 120  
2008 Hattiesburg (Forrest & Lamar Counties) 130  
2008 Jackson (Hinds, Madison, & Rankin Counties) 650  
  Other Places 425  
  Total Mississippi 1525  
  Missouri   
2014 Columbia 400  
2009 Jefferson City 100  
2017 Joplin 100  
2016 Kansas City-Kansas portion (Johnson & Wyandotte Counties) (1985)d 16,000  
2016 Kansas City-Missouri portion (1985)d 2000  
2016 Kansas City Total (1985)d 18,000  
2009 St. Joseph (Buchanan County) 200  
2019 Creve Coeur Area (2014) 13,550  
2019 Chesterfield (2014) 12,150  
2019 University City/Clayton (2014) 9100  
2019 Olivette/Ladue (2014) 6200  
2019 St. Charles County (2014) 5900  
2019 St. Louis City (2014) 5150  
2019 Des Peres/Kirkwood/Webster (2014) 2750  
2019 Other North County (2014) 4400  
2019 Other South County (2014) 1900  
2019 St. Louis Total (2014) 61,100  
2009 Springfield 300  
  Other Places 75  
2015 Jewish Federation of Southern Illinois, Southeast Missouri and Western Kentucky
(Alton-Belleville-Benton-Carbondale-Centralia-Collinsville-East St. Louis-Herrin-Marion in Southern Illinois,
Cape Girardeau-Farmington-Sikeston in Southeast Missouri, & Paducah in Western Kentucky) Total
650  
  Total Missouri 64,275  
  Montana   
2017 Billings (Yellowstone County) 250  
2009 Bozeman 500  
2017 Helena 120  
2015 Kalispell-Whitefish (Flathead County) 250  
2017 Missoula 200  
1997–2001 Other Places 75  
  Total Montana 1395  
  Nebraska   
2014 Lincoln 400  
2019 East Omaha (2017) 1900  
2019 West Omaha (2017) 5700  
2019 Other Areas (2017) 1200  
2019 Omaha Total (2017) 8800  
2012 Other Places 150  
  Total Nebraska 9350  
  Nevada   
2019 Northwest (2005) 24,500  
2019 Southwest (2005) 16,000  
2019 Central (2005) 6000  
2019 Southeast (2005) 18,000  
2019 Northeast (2005) 7800  
2019 Las Vegas Total (2005) 72,300  
2011 Reno-Carson City (Carson City & Washoe Counties) (2011)a 4000  
  Total Nevada 76,300  
  New Hampshire   
1997–2001 Concord 500  
1997–2001 Franklin-Laconia-Meredith-Plymouth 270  
Pre-1997 Hanover-Lebanon 600  
2001 Keene 300  
1997–2001 Littleton-Bethlehem 200 70
1997–2001 Manchester (1983)d 4000  
1997–2001 Nashua 2000  
2008 North Conway-Mount Washington Valley 100  
2014 Portsmouth-Exeter (Rockingham County) 1250  
1997–2001 Salem 150 70
2014 Strafford (Dover-Rochester) (2007)a 700  
1997–2001 Other Places 50  
  Total New Hampshire 10,120 140
  New Jersey   
2004 The Island (Atlantic City) (2004) 5450 6700
2004 The Mainland (2004) 6250 600
2004 Atlantic County Subtotal (2004) 11,700 7300
2004 Cape May County-Wildwood (2004) 500 900
2004 Jewish Federation of Atlantic & Cape May Counties Total (2004) 12,200 8200
2018 Pascack-Northern Valley (2001) 11,900  
2018 North Palisades (2001) 18,600  
2018 Central Bergen (2001) 22,200  
2018 West Bergen (2001) 14,300  
2018 South Bergen (2001) 10,000  
2018 Other Bergen 23,000  
2018 Bergen County Subtotal 100,000  
2018 Northern Hudson County (2001) 2000  
2018 Bayonne 1600  
2018 Hoboken 1800  
2018 Jersey City 6000  
2018 Hudson County Subtotal 11,400  
2018 Northern Passaic County 8000  
2018 Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey (Bergen, Hudson, & northern Passaic Counties) Total 119,400  
2019 Camden County (1991, 2013)e 34,600  
2019 Burlington County (1991, 2013)e 15,900  
2019 Northern Gloucester County (1991, 2013)e 6200  
2019 Jewish Federation of Southern New Jersey Total (1991, 2013)e 56,700  
2019 South Essex (Newark) (1998, 2012)b 12,200  
2019 Livingston (1998, 2012)b 10,500  
2019 North Essex (1998, 2012)b 13,000  
2019 West Orange-Orange (1998, 2012)b 9000  
2019 East Essex (1998, 2012)b 3500  
2019 Essex County Subtotal (1998, 2012)b 48,200  
2019 West Morris (1998, 2012)b 13,700  
2019 North Morris (1998, 2012)b 13,400  
2019 South Morris (1998, 2012)b 3200  
2019 Morris County Subtotal (1998, 2012)b 30,300  
2019 Northern Somerset County (2012)a 7400  
2019 Sussex County (1998, 2012)b 4700  
2019 Union County (2012)a 24,400  
2019 Jewish Federation of Greater MetroWest NJ (Essex, Morris, northern Somerset, Sussex,   
  & Union Counties) Total (2012) 115,000  
2008 North Middlesex (Edison-Piscataway-Woodbridge) (2008) 3600  
2008 Highland Park-South Edison (2008) 5700  
2008 Central Middlesex (East Brunswick-New Brunswick) (2008) 24,800  
2008 South Middlesex (Monroe Township) (2008) 17,900  
  Middlesex County Subtotal (2008) 52,000  
2006 Western Monmouth (Freehold-Howell-Manalapan-Marlboro) (1997) 37,800  
2006 Eastern Monmouth (Asbury Park-Deal-Long Branch) (1997) 17,300  
2006 Northern Monmouth (Hazlet-Highlands-Middletown-Union Beach) (1997) 8900  
  Monmouth County Subtotal (2008) 64,000 6000
2006 Jewish Federation in the Heart of New Jersey Total 116,000 6000
2018 Lakewood 74,500  
2018 Other Ocean County 8500  
2018 Ocean County Total 83,000  
2009 Southern Passaic County (Clifton-Passaic) 12,000  
1997–2001 Princeton 3000  
2019 Hunterdon County (2012)a 6000  
2019 Southern Somerset County (2012)a 11,600  
2019 Warren County (2012)a 2400  
2019 Jewish Federation of Somerset, Hunterdon & Warren Counties Total (2012)a 20,000  
1997–2001 Trenton (most of Mercer County) (1975)d 6000  
2015 Vineland area (including southern Gloucester & eastern Salem Counties) (Jewish Federation of Cumberland,
Gloucester and Salem Counties)
2000  
1997–2001 Other Places 150  
  Total New Jersey 545,450 14,200
  New Mexico   
2011 Albuquerque (Bernalillo County) (2011)a 7500  
2016 El Paso (Texas) 5000  
2016 Las Cruces 500  
2016 Jewish Federation of Greater El Paso (Total) 5500  
2009 Los Alamos 250  
2011 Santa Fe-Las Vegas 4000  
Pre-1997 Taos 300  
1997–2001 Other Places 75  
  Total New Mexico 12,625  
  New York   
2019 Albany (Albany County) 12,000  
2019 Amsterdam 100  
2019 Catskill 200  
2019 Glens Falls-Lake George (southern Essex, northern Saratoga, Warren, & Washington Counties) 800  
2019 Gloversville (Fulton County) 300  
2019 Hudson (Columbia County) 500  
2019 Saratoga Springs 600  
2019 Schenectady 5200  
2019 Troy 800  
2019 Jewish Federation of Northeastern New York (Total) 20,500  
1997–2001 Auburn (Cayuga County) 115  
1997–2001 Binghamton (Broome County) 2400  
2019 Buffalo (Erie County) (2013) 10,700  
2019 Other Western New York (parts of Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Genesee, Niagara,
& Wyoming Counties) (2013)d
300  
2019 Jewish Federation of Greater Buffalo Total (2013) 11,000  
1997–2001 Canandaigua-Geneva-Newark-Seneca Falls 300  
1997–2001 Cortland (Cortland County) 150  
2019 Dutchess County (Amenia-Beacon-Fishkill-Freedom Plains-Hyde Park-Poughkeepsie-Red Hook-Rhinebeck) 10,000  
2009 Elmira-Corning (Chemung, Schuyler, southeastern Steuben, & Tioga Counties) 700  
1997–2001 Fleischmanns 100  
1997–2001 Herkimer (Herkimer County) 130  
1997–2001 Ithaca (Tompkins County) 2000  
1997–2001 Jamestown 100  
2019 Northeast Bronx (2011) 18,300  
2019 Riverdale-Kingsbridge (2011) 20,100  
2019 Other Bronx (2011) 15,500  
2019 Bronx Subtotal (2011) 53,900  
2019 Bensonhurst-Gravesend-Bay Ridge (2011) 47,000  
2019 Borough Park (2011) 131,100  
2019 Brownstone Brooklyn (2011) 19,700  
2019 Canarsie-Mill Basin (2011) 24,500  
2019 Coney Island-Brighton Beach-Sheepshead Bay (2011) 56,200  
2019 Crown Heights (2011) 23,800  
2019 Flatbush-Midwood-Kensington (2011) 108,500  
2019 Kings Bay-Madison (2011) 29,400  
2019 Williamsburg (2011) 74,500  
2019 Other Brooklyn (2011) 46,400  
2019 Brooklyn Subtotal (2011) 561,100  
2019 Lower Manhattan East (2011) 39,500  
2019 Lower Manhattan West (2011) 33,200  
2019 Upper East Side (2011) 57,400  
2019 Upper West Side (2011) 70,500  
2019 Washington Heights-Inwood (2011) 21,400  
2019 Other Manhattan (2011) 17,700  
2019 Manhattan Subtotal (2011) 239,700  
2019 Flushing-Bay Terrace-Little Neck Area (2011) 26,800  
2019 Forest Hills-Rego Park-Kew Gardens Area (2011) 60,900  
2019 Kew Gardens Hills-Jamaica-Fresh Meadows Area (2011) 41,600  
2019 Long Island City-Astoria-Elmhurst Area (2011) 12,100  
2019 The Rockaways (2011) 22,500  
2019 Other Queens (2011) 33,900  
2019 Queens Subtotal (2011) 197,800  
2019 Mid-Staten Island (2011) 18,800  
2019 Southern Staten Island (2011) 8800  
2019 Other Staten Island (2011) 6300  
2019 Staten Island Subtotal (2011) 33,900  
2019 New York City Subtotal (2011) 1,086,400  
2019 Five Towns (2011) 25,000  
2019 Great Neck (2011) 28,700  
2019 Merrick-Bellmore-East Meadow-Massapequa Area (2011) 38,500  
2019 Oceanside-Long Beach-West Hempstead-Valley Stream Area (2011) 45,900  
2019 Plainview-Syosset-Jericho Area (2011) 35,800  
2019 Roslyn-Port Washington-Glen Cove-Old Westbury-Oyster Bay Area (2011) 34,800  
2019 Other Nassau (2011) 21,200  
2019 Nassau County Subtotal (2011) 229,900  
2019 Commack-East Northport-Huntington Area (2011) 19,300  
2019 Dix Hills-Huntington Station-Melville (2011) 16,500  
2019 Smithtown-Port Jefferson-Stony Brook Area (2011) 16,500  
2019 Other Suffolk (2011) 33,400  
2019 Suffolk County Subtotal (2011) 85,700  
2019 South-Central Westchester (2011) 46,200  
2019 Sound Shore Communities (2011) 18,900  
2019 River Towns (2011) 30,800  
2019 North-Central & Northwestern Westchester (2011) 25,300  
2019 Other Westchester (2011) 15,000  
2019 Westchester County Subtotal (2011) 136,200  
2019 New York Metro Area (New York City & Nassau, Suffolk, & Westchester
Counties) Total (2011)
1,538,000  
1997–2001 Niagara Falls 150  
2009 Olean 100  
1997–2001 Oneonta (Delaware & Otsego Counties) 300  
2019 Kiryas Joel (2018)c 25,300  
2019 Other Orange County (Middletown-Monroe-Newburgh-Port Jervis) 12,000  
2019 Orange County Total 37,300  
1997–2001 Plattsburgh 250  
1997–2001 Potsdam 200  
2016 Putnam County (2010)d 3900  
2019 Brighton (1999, 2010)e 10,100  
2019 Pittsford (1999, 2010)e 3800  
2019 Other Places in Monroe County & Victor in Ontario County (1999, 2010)e 6000  
2019 Rochester Total (1999, 2010)e 19,900  
2019 Kaser Village (2018)c 5400  
2019 Monsey (2018)c 22,000  
2019 New Square (2018)c 8600  
2019 Other Rockland County 66,600  
  Rockland County Total 102,600  
1997–2001 Rome 100  
Pre-1997 Sullivan County (Liberty-Monticello) 7425  
2018 Syracuse (western Madison, Onondaga, & most of Oswego Counties) 7000  
2014 Ulster County (Kingston-New Paltz-Woodstock & eastern Ulster County) 5000  
2019 Utica (southeastern Oneida County) (Jewish Community Federation of the Mohawk Valley) 1100  
1997–2001 Watertown 100  
1997–2001 Other Places 400  
  Total New York 1,771,320  
  North Carolina   
2011 Buncombe County (Asheville) (2011)d 2530 415
2011 Hendersonville County (Henderson) (2011)d 510 100
2011 Transylvania County (Brevard) (2011)d 80 130
2011 Macon County (2011)d 60 30
2011 Other Western North Carolina (2011)d 220 160
2011 WNC Jewish Federation (Western North Carolina) Total (2011)d 3400 835
2009 Boone 60 225
2016 Charlotte (Mecklenburg County) (1997) 12,000  
2019 Orange County 3900  
2019 Durham County 3075  
2019 Other (Chatham & parts of Wake County) 525  
2019 Jewish Federation of Durham-Chapel Hilld 7500  
2012 Fayetteville (Cumberland County) 300  
2009 Gastonia (Cleveland, Gaston, & Lincoln Counties) 250  
2019 Greensboro 3000  
2015 Greenville 300  
2011 Hickory 250  
2009 High Point 150  
2009 Mooresville (Iredell County) 150  
2009 New Bern 150  
2009 Pinehurst 250  
2019 Raleigh-Cary (Wake County) 15,000  
2014 Southeastern North Carolina (Elizabethtown-Whiteville-Wilmington) 1600  
2011 Statesville (Iredell County) 150  
2015 Winston-Salem (2011)a 1200  
2010 Other Places 225  
  Total North Carolina 45,935 1060
  North Dakota   
2008 Fargo 150  
2011 Grand Forks 150  
1997–2001 Other Places 100  
  Total North Dakota 400  
  Ohio   
2016 Akron-Kent (parts of Portage & Summit Counties) (1999)d 3000  
Pre-1997 Athens 100  
2006 Canton-New Philadelphia (Stark & Tuscarawas Counties) (1955)d 1000  
2019 Downtown Cincinnati (2008) 700  
2019 Hyde Park-Mount Lookout-Oakley (2008) 3100  
2019 Amberley Village-Golf Manor-Roselawn (2008) 5100  
2019 Blue Ash-Kenwood-Montgomery (2008) 9000  
2019 Loveland-Mason-Middletown (2008) 5500  
2019 Wyoming-Finneytown-Reading (2008) 2000  
2019 Other Places in Cincinnati (2008) 1300  
2019 Covington-Newport (Kentucky) (2008) 300  
2019 Jewish Federation of Cincinnati Total (2008) 27,000  
2019 The Heights (2011) 22,200  
2019 East Side Suburbs (2011) 5,300  
2019 Beachwood (2011) 10,700  
2019 Solon & Southeast Suburbs (2011) 15,300  
2019 Northern Heights (2011) 10,400  
2019 West Side/Central Area (2011) 11,900  
2019 Northeast (2011) 5000  
2019 Cleveland (Cuyahoga & parts of Geauga, Lake, Portage, & Summit Counties) Total (2011) 80,800  
2019 Perimeter North (2013) 4700  
2019 Bexley area (2013) 5400  
2019 East (2013) 6400  
2019 Downtown/University (2013) 9000  
2019 Columbus Total (2013) 25,500  
2019 Dayton (Greene & Montgomery Counties) (1986)d 4000  
1997–2001 Elyria-Oberlin 155  
1997–2001 Hamilton-Middletown-Oxford 900  
1997–2001 Lima (Allen County) 180  
Pre-1997 Lorain 600  
1997–2001 Mansfield 150  
1997–2001 Marion 125  
1997–2001 Sandusky-Fremont-Norwalk (Huron & Sandusky Counties) 105  
1997–2001 Springfield 200  
2019 Toledo-Bowling Green (Fulton, Lucas, & Wood Counties) (1994)d 2300  
1997–2001 Wooster 175  
2019 Youngstown-Warren (Mahoning & Trumbull Counties) (2002)d 1300  
1997–2001 Zanesville (Muskingum County) 100  
1997–2001 Other Places 425  
2015 Youngstown Area Jewish Federation (including Mahoning & Trumbull Counties in Ohio
& Mercer County in Pennsylvania) Total
1700  
2015 Jewish Federation of Greater Toledo (Fulton, Lucas, & Wood Counties in Ohio & Lenawee &   
  Monroe Counties in Michigan) Total 2300  
  Total Ohio 147,815  
  Oklahoma   
2019 Oklahoma City-Norman (Cleveland & Oklahoma Counties) (2010)a 2300  
2019 Tulsa 2000  
2012 Other Places 125  
  Total Oklahoma 4425  
  Oregon   
2010 Bend (2010)a 1000  
1997–2001 Corvallis 500  
1997–2001 Eugene 3250  
1997–2001 Medford-Ashland-Grants Pass (Jackson & Josephine Counties) 1000  
2019 Portland (Clackamas, Multnomah, & Washington Counties) (2011)d 33,800  
2019 Clark County (Vancouver, WA) (2011)d 2600  
2019 Greater Portland Total (2011)d 36,400  
1997–2001 Salem (Marion & Polk Counties) 1000  
1997–2001 Other Places 100  
  Total Oregon 40,650  
  Pennsylvania   
2014 Altoona (Blair County) 450  
1997–2001 Beaver Falls (northern Beaver County) 180  
1997–2001 Butler (Butler County) 250  
2007 Carbon County (2007)a 600  
1997–2001 Chambersburg 150  
2018 Erie (Erie County) 500  
2016 East Shore (1994) 3000  
2016 West Shore (1994) 2000  
1994 Harrisburg Total (1994) 5000  
2019 Hazelton-Tamaqua 100  
2014 Johnstown (Cambria & Somerset Counties) 150  
2014 Lancaster 3000  
2014 Lebanon (Lebanon County) 165  
2018 Allentown (2007) 5950  
2018 Bethlehem (2007) 1050  
2018 Easton (2007) 1050  
2018 Lehigh Valley Total (2007) 8050  
2015 Mercer County (Sharon-Farrell) 300  
2007 Monroe County (2007)a 2300  
2016 Bucks County (2009) 41,400  
2016 Chester County (Oxford-Kennett Square-Phoenixville-West Chester) (2009) 20,900  
2016 Delaware County (Chester-Coatesville) (2009) 21,000  
2016 Montgomery County (Norristown) (2009) 64,500  
2016 Philadelphia (2009) 66,900  
2016 Greater Philadelphia Total (2009) 214,700  
2008 Pike County 300  
2019 Squirrel Hill (2017) 14,800  
2019 Rest of Pittsburgh (2017) 12,800  
2019 South Hills (Mt. Lebanon-Upper St. Clair) (2017) 8800  
2019 North Hills (Hampton, Fox Chapel, O’Hara) (2017) 5400  
2019 Other Places in Greater Pittsburgh (2017) 7400  
2019 Greater Pittsburgh (Allegheny, Beaver, Butler, Washington, 49,200  
  & Westmoreland Counties) Total (2017)   
1997–2001 Pottstown 650  
1997–2001 Pottsville 120  
1997–2001 Reading (Berks County) 2200  
2008 Scranton (Lackawanna County) (Northeastern Pennsylvania) 3100  
2009 State College-Bellefonte-Philipsburg 900  
1997–2001 Sunbury-Lewisburg-Milton-Selinsgrove-Shamokin 200  
1997–2001 Uniontown 150  
2008 Wayne County (Honesdale) 500  
2019 Wilkes-Barre (Luzerne County, excluding Hazelton-Tamaqua) (2005)d 1800  
2014 Williamsport-Lock Haven (Clinton & Lycoming Counties) 150  
2009 York (1999) 1800  
1997–2001 Other Places 900  
2015 Youngstown Area Jewish Federation (including Mahoning & Trumbull Counties in Ohio & Mercer County in Pennsylvania) Total 1700  
  Total Pennsylvania 297,865  
  Rhode Island   
2019 Attleboro, MA (2002)a 800  
2019 Providence-Pawtucket (2002) 7500  
2019 West Bay (2002) 6350  
2019 East Bay (2002) 1100  
2019 South County (Washington County) (2002) 1800  
2019 Northern Rhode Island (2002) 1000  
2019 Newport County (2002) 1000  
2019 Total Rhode Island (2002) 18,750  
2019 Jewish Alliance of Greater Rhode Island Total 19,550  
  South Carolina   
2009 Aiken 100  
2009 Anderson 100  
2009 Beaufort 100  
2018 Charleston (Charleston, Dorchester, and Berkley Counties) 9000  
2015 Columbia (Lexington & Richland Counties) 3000  
2009 Florence 220  
2009 Georgetown 100  
2010 Greenville (2010)a 2000  
2012 Myrtle Beach (Horry County) 1500  
1997–2001 Spartanburg (Spartanburg County) 500  
2009 Sumter (Clarendon & Sumter Counties) 100  
2009 Other Places 100  
  Total South Carolina 16,820  
  South Dakota   
2009 Rapid City 100  
2014 Sioux Falls 100  
1997–2001 Other Places 50  
  Total South Dakota 250  
  Tennessee   
2013 Bristol-Johnson City-Kingsport 125  
2019 Chattanooga (2011)a 1400  
2016 Knoxville (2010)a 2000  
2018 Memphis (2006)d 10,000  
2019 Davidson County (2016) 6450  
2019 Williamson County (2016) 1700  
2019 Other Central Tennessee (2016) 850  
2019 Nashville (2016) Total 9000  
2010 Oak Ridge (2010)a 150  
2009 Other Places 125  
  Total Tennessee 22,800  
  Texas   
2012 Amarillo (Carson, Childress, Deaf Smith, Gray, Hall, Hutchinson, Moore, Potter, & Randall Counties) 200  
2019 Austin (Travis, Williamson, Hays, Bastrop, & Caldwell Counties) 30,000  
2014 Beaumont 300  
2011 Brownsville 200  
2011 Bryan-College Station 400  
2011 Columbus-Hallettsville-La Grange-Schulenburg (Colorado, Fayette, & Lavaca Counties) 100  
2015 Corpus Christi (Nueces County) 1000  
2019 North Dallas (1988, 2013)e 12,500  
2019 Plano-Frisco-Richardson-Allen-McKinney (1988, 2013)e 14,700  
2019 Central Dallas-Downtown-Uptown (1988, 2013)e 23,500  
2019 East Dallas (1988, 2013)e 1300  
2019 Denton-Flowermound-Lewisville (1988, 2013)e 900  
2019 South Dallas-Duncanville-Cedar Hill (1988, 2013)e 200  
2019 Addison-Carrolton-Farmers Branch (1988, 2013)e 2700  
2019 Other Places in Dallas (1988, 2013)e 14,200  
2019 Dallas (southern Collin, Dallas, & southeastern Denton Counties) Total (1988, 2013)e 70,000  
2016 El Paso 5000  
2016 Las Cruces (New Mexico) 500  
2016 Jewish Federation of Greater El Paso (Total) 5500  
2016 Fort Worth (Tarrant County) 5000  
2011 Galveston 600  
2011 Harlingen-Mercedes 150  
2019 Core Area (2016) 19,800  
2019 Memorial (2016) 5100  
2019 Central City (2016) 6000  
2019 Suburban Southwest (2016) 5800  
2019 West (2016) 3600  
2019 North (2016) 7300  
2019 Southwest (2016) 3000  
2019 East (2016) 400  
2019 Houston (Harris County & parts of Brazoria, Fort Bend, Galveston
& Montgomery Counties) Total (2016)
51,000  
2011 Kilgore-Longview 100  
2017 Laredo 150  
2012 Lubbock (Lubbock County) 230  
2011 McAllen (Hidalgo & Starr Counties) 300  
2012 Midland-Odessa 200  
2011 Port Arthur 100  
2007 Inside Loop 410 (2007) 2000  
2007 Between the Loops (2007) 5600  
2007 Outside Loop 1604 (2007) 1600  
2007 San Antonio Total (2007) 9200  
2007 San Antonio Surrounding Counties (Atascosa, Bandera, Comal, Guadalupe, Kendall,
Medina, & Wilson Counties) (2007)a
1000  
2014 Tyler 250  
2014 Waco (Bell, Coryell, Falls, Hamilton, Hill, & McLennan Counties) 400  
2012 Wichita Falls 150  
2011 Other Places 450  
  Total Texas 176,480  
  Utah   
1997–2001 Ogden 150  
2009 Park City 600 400
2010 Salt Lake City (Salt Lake County) (2010)a 4800  
1997–2001 Other Places 100  
  Total Utah 5650 400
  Vermont   
1997–2001 Bennington 500  
2008 Brattleboro 350  
2019 Burlington 3500  
1997–2001 Manchester 325  
2008 Middlebury 200  
2008 Montpelier-Barre 550  
2008 Rutland 300  
1997–2001 St. Johnsbury-Newport (Caledonia & Orleans Counties) 140  
2019 Stowe 1000  
Pre-1997 Woodstock 270  
  Total Vermont 7135  
  Virginia   
2013 Blacksburg-Christiansburg-Floyd-Radford 250  
2015 Charlottesville 2000  
2012 Fauquier County (Warrenton) 100  
2013 Fredericksburg (parts of King George, Orange, Spotsylvania, & Stafford Counties) 500  
2013 Harrisonburg 300  
2013 Lynchburg 350  
2019 Newport News-Hampton 2250  
2019 Williamsburg 750  
2019 United Jewish Community of the Virginia Peninsula Total 3000  
2008 Norfolk (2001) 3550  
2008 Virginia Beach (2001) 6000  
2008 Chesapeake-Portsmouth-Suffolk (2001) 1400  
2008 United Jewish Federation of Tidewater Total (2001) 10,950  
2017 North-Central Northern Virginia (2017) 24,500  
2017 Central Northern Virginia (2017) 23,100  
2017 East Northern Virginia (2017) 54,400  
2017 West-Northern Virginia (2017) 19,400  
2016 Jewish Federation of Greater Washington Total in Northern Virginia (2017) 121,400  
2013 Petersburg-Colonial Heights-Hopewell 300  
2011 Central (1994, 2011)b 1300  
2011 West End (1994, 2011)b 1200  
2011 Far West End (1994, 2011)b 4100  
2011 Northeast (1994, 2011)b 1200  
2011 Southside (1994, 2011)b 2200  
2011 Richmond (City of Richmond & Chesterfield, Goochland, Hanover, Henrico, & Powhatan Counties) Total 10,000  
  (1994, 2011)b   
2013 Roanoke 1000  
2013 Staunton-Lexington 100  
2013 Winchester (Clarke, Frederick, & Warren Counties) 270  
2013 Other Places 75  
  Total Virginia 150,595  
  Washington   
1997–2001 Bellingham 525  
2011 Clark County (Vancouver) (2011)d 2600  
1997–2001 Kennewick-Pasco-Richland 300  
2011 Longview-Kelso 100  
1997–2001 Olympia (Thurston County) 560  
Pre-1997 Port Angeles 100  
2009 Port Townsend 200  
2014 Pullman (Whitman County, Palouse) 100  
2019 South Seattle (Southeast Seattle-Southwest Seattle-Downtown) (2014) 16,500  
2019 North Seattle (Northeast & Northwest Seattle) (2014) 16,400  
2019 Bellevue (2014) 6300  
2019 Mercer Island (2014) 6400  
2019 Redmond (2014) 3000  
2019 Rest of King County (2014) 9400  
2019 Island, Kitsap, Pierce, & Snohomish Counties (2014) 6650  
2019 Seattle Total (2014) 64,650  
1997–2001 Spokane 1500  
2009 Tacoma (Pierce County) 2500  
1997–2001 Yakima-Ellensburg (Kittitas & Yakima Counties) 150  
1997–2001 Other Places 150  
  Total Washington 73,435  
  West Virginia   
2011 Bluefield-Princeton 100  
2007 Charleston (Kanawha County) 975  
1997–2001 Clarksburg 110  
1997–2001 Huntington 250  
1997–2001 Morgantown 200  
Pre-1997 Parkersburg 110  
1997–2001 Wheeling 290  
1997–2001 Other Places 275  
  Total West Virginia 2310  
  Wisconsin   
2015 Appleton & other Fox Cities (Outagamie, Calumet, & northern Winnebago Counties) 200  
1997–2001 Beloit-Janesville 120  
1997–2001 Green Bay 500  
1997–2001 Kenosha (Kenosha County) 300  
1997–2001 La Crosse 100  
2017 Madison (Dane County) 5000  
2019 City of Milwaukee (2011) 4900  
2019 North Shore (2011) 13,400  
2019 Waukesha (2011) 3200  
2019 Milwaukee County Ring (2011) 4300  
2019 Milwaukee (Milwaukee, southern Ozaukee, & eastern Waukesha Counties) Total (2011) 25,800  
1997–2001 Oshkosh-Fond du Lac 170  
1997–2001 Racine (Racine County) 200  
1997–2001 Sheboygan 140  
2015 Wausau-Antigo-Marshfield-Stevens Point 300  
1997–2001 Other Places 225  
  Total Wisconsin 33,055  
  Wyoming   
1997–2001 Casper 150  
2012 Cheyenne 500  
2008 Jackson Hole 300  
2008 Laramie 200  
  Total Wyoming 1150  

and a table showing the calculations for the indices of dissimilarity referenced above.

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Sheskin, I.M., Dashefsky, A. (2020). United States Jewish Population, 2019. In: Dashefsky, A., Sheskin, I. (eds) American Jewish Year Book 2019. American Jewish Year Book, vol 119. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-40371-3_5

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