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Working with/in Deleuzo-Guattarian Ideas

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Part of the International Explorations in Outdoor and Environmental Education book series (IEOEE)

Abstract

This plateau introduces the ideas of Deleuze and Guattari that are employed in this book, namely rhizome, plateaus, deterritorialisation and line(s) of flight, becoming and assemblage. The plateau includes discussion of the generative use of Deleuzo-Guattarian concepts with/in education.

Keywords

Deleuze and Guattari Rhizome Plateaus Deterritorialization Line(s) of flight Becoming Assemblage 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EducationLa Trobe UniversityBendigoAustralia

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