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Media and Communication Studies in the Age of Digitalization and Datafication: How Practical Factors and Research Interests Determine Methodological Choices

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Abstract

Digital and computational methods promise to fundamentally change research practices in media and communications studies. However, due to economic and other practical reasons, access to digital data is often restricted. For example, acquiring the necessary skills in developing and applying tools for data collection and analysis is a time-consuming process. Often, researchers have no other choice than using traditional methods for various reasons. Also, their research interests may also not fit a heavily data-driven approach. This chapter discusses some of the obstacles to digitalizing research practices in the field but also makes the argument why new research strategies should be embraced where possible.

Keywords

  • Digital humanities
  • Quantitative research
  • Qualitative research
  • Mixed methods

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Nguyen, D. (2020). Media and Communication Studies in the Age of Digitalization and Datafication: How Practical Factors and Research Interests Determine Methodological Choices. In: Nguyen, D., Dekker, I., Nguyen, S. (eds) Understanding Media and Society in the Age of Digitalisation. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-38577-4_2

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