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Eugen Fink and Existential Play

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Abstract

The particular way in which German phenomenologist Eugen Fink understands ‘play’ is deeply involved with fundamental existential concerns such as the question of freedom. This chapter discusses the existential significance Fink grants to play—considering, specifically, the capacity play grants us to explore unactualized dimensions of our being through the taking-on of a role in the playworld and presenting in some detail Fink’s treatment of the significance of the mask. This understanding of play is then used to offer a perspective on the relationships between one’s actual self and one’s roles in virtual environments.

Keywords

Fink Play Role Virtual worlds Mask 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Digital GamesUniversity of MaltaMsidaMalta

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