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Addiction Recovery in Services and Policy: An International Overview

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Textbook of Addiction Treatment

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the changes occurring in the recovery field in the United States and internationally, with special emphasis on the growing focus on recovery as the guiding vision for drug policy and as a framework for treatment. ‘Recovery’ goes beyond substance use to encompass improved functioning in all life areas and the realisation of individual aspirations. As substance use disorders are often chronic and relapsing, recovery is conceptualised as a process that unfolds over time and requires a continuing care approach. We describe emerging service models, including recovery-oriented systems of care (ROSC) and the centrality of peer-driven recovery supports as part of a social and community emphasis on recovery sustainability. We conclude with some recommendations on strategies that professionals, peers and communities can be used to promote recovery amongst substance-using individuals.

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Best, D., Hamer, R. (2021). Addiction Recovery in Services and Policy: An International Overview. In: el-Guebaly, N., Carrà, G., Galanter, M., Baldacchino, A.M. (eds) Textbook of Addiction Treatment. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-36391-8_50

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