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Pharmacological Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorder

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Abstract

Alcohol use disorder (AUD) is a severe condition associated with negative health, social and economic consequences, yet it often remains untreated. Pharmacological treatments for AUD are effective, especially in combination with other behavioural or psychosocial interventions. Disulfiram, naltrexone, acamprosate and nalmefene are approved pharmacological treatments for AUD. In addition, medications for other health conditions can be prescribed ‘off-label’, and further potentially useful drugs are under investigation. Current research is seeking to better understand predictors of treatment response which may ultimately lead to improved treatment outcomes in the future. This chapter provides a summary of approved pharmacological treatments and other medications that may prove useful in the treatment of AUD.

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Trick, L., Le Foll, B. (2021). Pharmacological Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorder. In: el-Guebaly, N., Carrà, G., Galanter, M., Baldacchino, A.M. (eds) Textbook of Addiction Treatment. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-36391-8_10

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