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An Ontology for Failure Interpretation in Automated Planning and Execution

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Robot 2019: Fourth Iberian Robotics Conference (ROBOT 2019)

Part of the book series: Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing ((AISC,volume 1092))

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Abstract

Autonomous indoor robots are supposed to accomplish tasks, like serve a cup, which involve manipulation actions, where task and motion planning levels are coupled. In both planning levels and execution phase, several source of failures can occur. In this paper, an interpretation ontology covering several sources of failures in automated planning and also during the execution phases is introduced with the purpose of working the planning more informed and the execution prepared for recovery. The proposed failure interpretation ontological module covers: (1) geometric failures, that may appear when e.g. the robot can not reach to grasp/place an object, there is no free-collision path or there is no feasible Inverse Kinematic (IK) solution. (2) hardware related failures that may appear when e.g. the robot in a real environment requires to be re-calibrated (gripper or arm), or it is sent to a non-reachable configuration. (3) software agent related failures, that may appear when e.g. the robot has software components that fail like when an algorithm is not able to extract the proper features. The paper describes the concepts and the implementation of failure interpretation ontology in several foundations like DUL and SUMO, and presents an example showing different situations in planning demonstrating the range of information the framework can provide for autonomous robots.

This work was partially funded by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) through the Collaborative Research Center 1320, EASE, and by the Spanish Government through the project DPI2016-80077-R. M. Diab is supported by the Spanish Government through the grants FPI 2017.

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  1. 1.

    http://protege.stanford.edu/.

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Correspondence to Mohammed Diab .

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Diab, M. et al. (2020). An Ontology for Failure Interpretation in Automated Planning and Execution. In: Silva, M., Luís Lima, J., Reis, L., Sanfeliu, A., Tardioli, D. (eds) Robot 2019: Fourth Iberian Robotics Conference. ROBOT 2019. Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, vol 1092. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-35990-4_31

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