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Conceptualising a Dynamic Technology Practice in Education Using Argyris and Schön’s Theory of Action

Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNISA,volume 11937)

Abstract

Despite substantial national effort to integrate technology in education, it seems that practitioners in the education system are not working in line with the given policy. Evidence from large-scale studies of students’ technology practices at school over the last decade show disparities in student practices. The observed gap between the micro and the macro level call for a closer exploration. Research that explores the influence of social and organizational factors may be useful for understanding the processes behind such gaps. Argyris and Schön’s ‘Theory of Action’ (1978) is proposed as an example of an organizational theory that can be adopted in educational technology research to move towards understanding the complexities of technology practice. To encourage discourse and application of Argyris and Schön’s theory in the field of educational technology research, this paper introduces the theory, a review of its empirical application in research of teacher educations’ technology practice and relevant conceptual work. The paper presents a conceptual framework based on Argyris and Schön’s theory that has been developed through two recent studies, and invites its application in future research and development.

Keywords

  • Theory of action
  • Digital school
  • Teacher education
  • Digital attitude
  • Digital literacy

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Correspondence to Siri Sollied Madsen .

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Madsen, S.S., Thorvaldsen, S. (2019). Conceptualising a Dynamic Technology Practice in Education Using Argyris and Schön’s Theory of Action. In: Rønningsbakk, L., Wu, TT., Sandnes, F., Huang, YM. (eds) Innovative Technologies and Learning. ICITL 2019. Lecture Notes in Computer Science(), vol 11937. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-35343-8_31

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-35343-8_31

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