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Conflict Model of Positive Psychotherapy

Abstract

As a psychodynamic modality, positive psychotherapy (PPT after Peseschkian) places its theory about conflict as a keystone in its approach to the clinical encounter. Conflict refers to the concurrence of different positions within one person or between persons. PPT works with a model of four categories of conflict: actual; key; basic; and inner. The actual conflict centers around acute or chronic situations happening at the present time. As such, the actual conflict is the current problematic life situation that leads to emotional stress caused by the mismatch between the expected and the observed. This mismatch may be a macro- or a micro-trauma and the reaction to these conflicts may affect any of the four areas/domains of life: body, achievement, contacts, and fantasy, each domain giving rise to different mental and psychosomatic presentations. The key conflict is a conscious inner conflict between the need to express one’s own interests (openness/honesty), and thus remain in contact with oneself (congruence) and the need not to compromise one's attitude to oneself and thereby stay in contact with the other (courtesy/politeness). The basic conflict is a family concept that becomes dysfunctional because of a current conflictual life situation. Finally, the inner conflict is an unconscious conflict of needs caused by the simultaneous existence of opposing or even mutually exclusive efforts, desires or ideals. A clinical example of supporting the client in working through these conflicts is discussed.

Keywords

  • Psychological Conflicts
  • Actual Conflict
  • Basic Conflict
  • Inner Conflict
  • Key Conflict
  • Psychodynamics
  • Positive Psychotherapy
  • PPT
  • Peseschkian

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Correspondence to Maksim Goncharov .

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Goncharov, M. (2020). Conflict Model of Positive Psychotherapy. In: Messias, E., Peseschkian, H., Cagande, C. (eds) Positive Psychiatry, Psychotherapy and Psychology. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-33264-8_27

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-33264-8_27

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