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Climate Change Adaptation Research and Policy for Agriculture in Southern Africa (CCARPASA)—Evidence from Rainfed Systems

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Part of the Sustainable Development Goals Series book series (SDGS)

Abstract

Sustainability of rainfed farming systems under climate variability and change conditions is a key concern for policy and adaptation planning processes to improve food and nutrition security. The challenge is to improve farming and tillage practices to enhance soil moisture availability and harvest excess runoff, thereby making the farming systems more reliable and resilient to the unpredictable risks of climate change and variability. In this short chapter, an assessment of climate change impact on the agricultural water availability for rainfed systems in southern Africa is discussed through a pilot project conducted recently as part of climate change adaptation integrated modelling of crop-climate-soil systems. We consider the Pandamatenga plains in north-eastern Botswana, which was undertaken with the main indicators of crop yield impact with respect to soil water availability and excess runoff harvesting potential, for the current climatology (1971–2000) and projected over the coming decades up to the 2050s. The indicators of rainfed practices of growing maize, sorghum and sunflower are discussed, which are likely influenced not only by climate, but also the response requiring local and regional adaptation investments for improved food security and increased productivity. This chapter recommends technical and policy interventions for incorporating climate change adaptation practices, with the view to outscale to national and possibly regional agricultural development planning processes.

Keywords

  • CCARDESA
  • CCARPASA project
  • Climate Smart Agriculture
  • SADC
  • CAADP
  • Food security
  • Rainfed agriculture
  • Farming system

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Fig. 14.1

(Adopted from CCARDESA 2014, Fig. 3.1)

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Acknowledgements

This research was commissioned by CCARDESA’s CCARPASA project funded by USAID/Feed the Future, which was jointly implemented by CCARDESA, University of Botswana and Continental Consultants based in Gaborone, Botswana. The authors also appreciate the support of the University of Botswana for funding the daily weather generation model development under Research Project Grant No: R025, “Development of Daily Precipitation Model for Botswana.” The authors also acknowledge the Department of Metrological Services for providing daily rainfall time series data used in the weather generation modelling, and the Ministry of Agriculture for proving soil and related information.

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Correspondence to Berhanu F. Alemaw .

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Alemaw, B.F., Podisi, B.K., Mwale, S., Simalenga, T.E. (2020). Climate Change Adaptation Research and Policy for Agriculture in Southern Africa (CCARPASA)—Evidence from Rainfed Systems. In: Matondo, J.I., Alemaw, B.F., Sandwidi, W.J.P. (eds) Climate Variability and Change in Africa . Sustainable Development Goals Series. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-31543-6_14

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