Advertisement

“Error 404- Struggling Learners Not Found” Exploring the Behavior of MOOC Learners

  • Paraskevi TopaliEmail author
  • Alejandro Ortega-Arranz
  • Yannis Dimitriadis
  • Alejandra Martínez-Monés
  • Sara L. Villagrá-Sobrino
  • Juan I. Asensio-Pérez
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11722)

Abstract

Lack of timely instructors’ support when the learners are struggling with the course contents and activities is one frequent problem of MOOC learners. The early identification of these learners could help instructors spend part of their limited time assisting them and avoid potential dropouts. This paper presents a MOOC case study that explores the behavior of learners who reported problems in private messages and discussion forums. The study aimed at the identification of parameters that might allow the detection of learners struggling with different course aspects. As the results suggested, the comparison of the learners’ activity traces reveals some common sequences that in the future could facilitate the identification of learners facing problems, even without reporting them. On the other hand, statistical analyses on learners’ behavior showed non-significant differences between the learners reporting putting their maximum effort to overcome a problem before asking for help and the ones who did not.

Keywords

MOOCs Learner’s problems Learner’s behavior 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research has been partially funded by the European Regional Development Fund and the National Research Agency of the Spanish Ministry of Science, Innovations and Universities under project grants TIN2017-85179-C3-2-R and TIN2014-53199- C3-2R, by the European Regional Development Fund (Operational program of Castile and León) and the Regional Government of Castile and León by the Regional Ministry of Education under the grant BOCYL-D-07062018-6 and the project grant VA257P18, and by the European Commission under project grant 588438-EPP-1-2017-1-EL-EPPKA2-KA.

References

  1. 1.
    Henderikx, M., Kreijns, K., Kalz, M.: A classification of barriers that influence intention achievement in MOOCs. In: Pammer-Schindler, V., Pérez-Sanagustín, M., Drachsler, H., Elferink, R., Scheffel, M. (eds.) EC-TEL 2018. LNCS, vol. 11082, pp. 3–15. Springer, Cham (2018).  https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-98572-5_1CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Almatrafi, O., Johri, A., Rangwala, H.: Needle in a haystack: identifying learner posts that require urgent response in MOOC discussion forums. Comput. Educ. 118, 1–9 (2018)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Hew, K.F., Cheung, W.S.: Students’ and instructors’ use of massive open online courses (MOOCs): motivations and challenges. Educ. Res. Rev. 12, 45–58 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Teusner, R., Hille, T., Staubitz, T.: Effects of automated interventions in programming assignments : evidence from a field experiment. In: Proceedings of the Fifth ACM Conference on Learning @ Scale - L@S 2018, London, United Kingdom (2018)Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    He, J., Bailey, J., Rubinstein, B.I., Zhang, R.: Identifying at-risk students in massive open online courses. In: Proceedings of the Twenty Ninth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, pp. 1749–1755 (2015)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paraskevi Topali
    • 1
    Email author
  • Alejandro Ortega-Arranz
    • 1
  • Yannis Dimitriadis
    • 1
  • Alejandra Martínez-Monés
    • 1
  • Sara L. Villagrá-Sobrino
    • 1
  • Juan I. Asensio-Pérez
    • 1
  1. 1.GSIC-EMIC Research GroupUniversidad de ValladolidValladolidSpain

Personalised recommendations