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The Royal Theatre Presents: Echoes of Melodrama in the Magic Kingdom

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Abstract

In March, 2013, Disneyland opened the Royal Theatre, condensing Disney films like Beauty and the Beast, Tangled, and Frozen into 22-minute stage adaptations. The decor of the theatre, the language of the characters, and the costuming of the performers all work together to evoke a nostalgic and loose sense of history that calls on guests to interact with the story in the style of an “old-time melodrama,” booing, hissing, cheering, and singing along to the story. In this essay Maria Patrice Amon argues that tourists are taught how to perform as actors and given a new hybrid identity as both performer and audience that extends to the parks as a whole. The essay explores the theatrical genre of melodrama and asserts that the Royal Theatre’s use of this genre gives the audience a way to exceed their assumed passivity and interact with the performers as actors themselves.

Keywords

Disneyland Melodrama Nostalgia Royal Theatre 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.CSU San MarcosNational CityUSA

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