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Regional Queerness and the Local Festival Communities

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Abstract

This chapter maps the complex interconnections of various queer festivals and activist events with their regional audiences. For the participants in the post-Yugoslav festival communities, the interactions are followed at the level of engaging with the festivals and with regional mobility. The analysis is based on the interviews with the members of festival communities in Zagreb and Ljubljana, particularly the ways in which they talk about their festival traveling in the region and the meaning it has in their lives. The description of regional queer festival field that emerges gives evidence of different mobility choices depending on positionality in terms of one’s role in the festival community, but also class and citizenship. The testimonies of the festival visitors also give voice to the importance of the regional queer festival interactions for the festivals, for regional activism and for the participants themselves.

Keywords

Queer festivals Mobility Pride activism Audiences Traveling 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Political SciencesUniversity of BolognaForliItaly

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