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Movere: Characterizing the Role of Emotion and Motivation in Shaping Human Behavior

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Part of the Nebraska Symposium on Motivation book series (NSM,volume 66)

Abstract

Emotion, like motivation, is derived from the Latin word movere (to move) and is one of the primary forces that activates or energizes our behaviors. Both emotion and motivation have important influences on many social and cognitive processes and can shape the way we navigate our social world. Emotion also has important implications for political behavior, as recent research has shown that emotion can contribute to political polarization, attraction to “fake news,” and the spread of misinformation. The field of affective science examines the nature of our emotional experience, expression, and the mechanisms with which we regulate these processes. Taken together, this field has important implications for our day-to-day lives, and for society more broadly. In this volume, we will provide a brief sampling of some of the areas of research that have been dedicated to elucidating the role of emotion and motivation in shaping human behavior.

Keywords

  • Affective science
  • Emotion
  • Behavior
  • Emotional valence categories
  • Long-term goal pursuit
  • Emotional experience
  • Emotional expression
  • Emotion regulation
  • Motivation
  • Role of emotion and motivation in shaping human behavior

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Acknowledgments

We were honored and delighted to organize the 66th annual Nebraska Symposium on Motivation. We would not have been able to accomplish this task without the help of many people. We would like to thank the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Chancellor Harvey Perlman and the late Professor Cora L. Friedline’s bequest to the University of Nebraska Foundation in memory of Professor Harry K. Wolfe. The symposium would not be possible without their generous gifts. We would also like to thank Professor Lisa J. Crockett, the incoming series editor, for her support in putting this program together and Debra A. Hope, the outgoing series editor, for her advice when getting started, including selecting and inviting speakers. Last but not least, we would like to thank Pam Waldvogel for her incredible behind-the-scenes support throughout this process, and our graduate student assistants, Catherine C. Brown and Nicholas R. Harp. Thank you all so much for all your hard work and commitment to helping to make the symposium a success.

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Neta, M., Haas, I.J. (2019). Movere: Characterizing the Role of Emotion and Motivation in Shaping Human Behavior. In: Neta, M., Haas, I. (eds) Emotion in the Mind and Body. Nebraska Symposium on Motivation, vol 66. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-27473-3_1

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