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Strategic Communication in EU-Russia Relations

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Abstract

This chapter aims to identify the main content and features of strategic communication, paying special attention to its organization, efficiency and ethical dimensions. The challenges for strategic communication of the European Union (EU) in their impact on the relations with Russia are analyzed. There are serious grounds for imaging further degradation of EU-Russia relations—even up to the highly undesirable and dangerous point of collapse and the use of military means. However, at the same time, there are also opportunities to increase trust and, over time, craft-friendly relations between states—not only in Europe but through the world. Of course, this will require radical changes in different countries, taking into account their national backgrounds, historical experience and shared realities and trends of the twenty-first century.

Keywords

  • Strategic communication
  • International security
  • International relations
  • The European Union
  • Russia

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  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-27253-1_2
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Notes

  1. 1.

    Stratcom, StratCom, SC and others are used rather often as abbreviations of the term “strategic communication (s).”

  2. 2.

    The Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Communications (DNSA/SC), The Center for US Global Engagement, The Office of Policy, Planning, and Resources for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs (R/PPR) and Bureaus of Educational and Cultural Affairs, Public Affairs , and International Information Programs which are overseen by Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and Public Affairs ; The Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs , Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Networks and Information Integration/Chief Information Officer, Special Operations Command (USSOCOM), the United States Agency for Global Media (USAGM) and other ones in this or that way dealing with strategic communication . The structures are in constant change and development.

  3. 3.

    In addition, in the section “Communication management and strategic communication in public administration” of the journal Public Administration. Electronic Bulletin (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia ), more than 100 articles have been published since August 2012.

  4. 4.

    Some US restaurants rewrote their menus to offer “freedom fries” instead of French fries, and national TV networks aired scenes of angry Americans dumping bottles of French wine to protest France ’s resistance to the US talk of an invasion of Iraq . The then president Jacques Chirac of France could not get a break on US or British media (see Muhammad 2011).

  5. 5.

    Fictitious communication exists only in the imagination of its originator.

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Correspondence to Evgeny Pashentsev .

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Pashentsev, E. (2020). Strategic Communication in EU-Russia Relations. In: Pashentsev, E. (eds) Strategic Communication in EU-Russia Relations . Palgrave Macmillan, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-27253-1_2

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