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Russia

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Abstract

The Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs has a very hierarchical and centralized structure. The majority of recruits come from the Moscow State University of International Relations. Diplomats generally focus on one region of the world, moving from post to post while slowly rising through the ranks. While the ministry is a prestigious institution in Russia, recent challenges have decreased its attraction for the best potential recruits. Many students in the pool of prospective diplomats cite a perceived lack of professional freedom within the ministry. As fewer of the traditionally trained Soviet era diplomats remain, the ministry will face the challenge of integrating the younger post-Soviet generation into the fabric of Russian diplomacy.

Keywords

Russia Diplomacy Diplomats Foreign policy Foreign ministry MGIMO 

Notes

Acknowledgment

The authors wish to thank the following diplomats and scholars who were consulted in researching and writing this chapter: Vladislav Zubok, Michael Kimmage, and Irvin Studin.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.2018 Master of Arts Degrees, Global Policy Studies and Russian, East European, and Eurasian StudiesThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  2. 2.Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public AffairsThe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA

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