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Transformative Changes and Developments of the Coworking Model: A Narrative Review

Part of the Studies on Entrepreneurship, Structural Change and Industrial Dynamics book series (ESID)

Abstract

Modern times have seen an emergence of new type of office spaces. Coworking spaces are commonly viewed as hybridised workspaces that are not solely perceived as optimal places to work, but as a source of social support for independent professionals and as physical entities that sprung the creation of collaborative communities. These spaces facilitate interactional effects with the use of mediation mechanisms and through serendipitous encounters with individuals from outside of one’s own social circle. By co-constructing a sense of community, these environments have reshuffled the flexible work practice and are significantly impacting the lives of flexible workers across the globe. The chapter presents a narrative review of available resources framing historical development of the flexible workspaces and their evolvement into the contemporary coworking environments. The chapter also highlights the role of collaborative workspaces in the modern economy and it proposes challenges for future research.

Keywords

  • Coworking
  • Workspace transformation
  • Collaborative office
  • Flexible workspaces
  • Sustainability
  • Work individualisation

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Acknowledgement

This work was supported by the Internal Grant Agency of the Faculty of Business Administration, University of Economics in Prague under no. IP300040.

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Correspondence to Marko Orel .

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Orel, M., Dvouletý, O. (2020). Transformative Changes and Developments of the Coworking Model: A Narrative Review. In: Ratten, V. (eds) Technological Progress, Inequality and Entrepreneurship. Studies on Entrepreneurship, Structural Change and Industrial Dynamics. Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-26245-7_2

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