Skip to main content

Values and Life Role Salience and Their Assessment in Career Counselling

  • 1646 Accesses

Abstract

This chapter examines the concepts of values, work values, life roles and role salience in career guidance and counselling. The methodological issues in their measurement are discussed (direct and indirect assessment, ranking and rating of values) and an overview of the main assessment instruments is presented. Finally, the use of values and role salience measures in traditional and postmodern approaches are discussed. An all-round approach, viewing values both as a person and a context variable, and utilising the advantages of both quantitative and qualitative assessments, is recommended.

Keywords

  • Values
  • Work values
  • Life role salience
  • Career assessment

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-25153-6_32
  • Chapter length: 27 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   169.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-3-030-25153-6
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   219.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   219.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Fig. 32.1
Fig. 32.2

References

  • Allport, G. W., Vernon, P. E., & Lindzey, G. (1970). The study of values (3rd ed.). Chicago: The Riverside Publishing Company.

    Google Scholar 

  • Alwin, D. F., & Krosnick, J. A. (1985). The measurement of values in surveys: A comparison of ratings and rankings. Public Opinion Quarterly, 49, 535–552. https://doi.org/10.1086/268949.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Armstrong, P. I., & Rounds, J. (2010). Integrating individual differences in career assessment: The atlas model of individual differences and the strong ring. The Career Development Quarterly, 59(2), 143–153. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.2161-0045.2010.tb00058.x.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Armstrong, P., Day, S. X., McVay, J. P., & Rounds, J. (2008). Holland’s RIASEC model as an integrative framework for individual differences. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 55(1), 1–18. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-0167.55.1.1.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Baron, J., & Spranca, A. (1997). Protected values. Orgnaizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 70(1), 1–16.

    Google Scholar 

  • Breme, F. J., & Cockriel, I. W. (1975). Work values and work interests: Are they the same? Journal of Vocational Behavior, 6, 331–336. https://doi.org/10.1016/0001-8791(75)90005-6.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Brown, D. (1996). Brown’s values-based holistic model of career and life-choices and satisfaction. In D. Brown, L. Brooks, et al. (Eds.), Career choice and development: Applying contemporary theories to practice (3rd ed., pp. 337–372). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Google Scholar 

  • Brown, D. (2002). The role of work values and cultural values in occupational choice, satisfaction, and success: A theoretical statement. Journal of Counseling and Development, 80, 48–56. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.1556-6678.2002.tb00165.x.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Brown, D., & Crace, R. K. (2002). Life values inventory: Facilitator’s guide. Williamsburg: Applied Psychological Resources.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cantril, H., & Allport, G. W. (1933). Recent application of the study of values. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 28, 259–273. https://doi.org/10.1037/h0072616.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Carruthers, T. E. (1968). Work values and chosen career: Note on a trial of an American work values inventory with British subjects. Occupational Psychology, 42, 11–117.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carter, R. T. (1991). Cultural values: A review of empirical research and implications for counseling. Journal of Counseling and Development, 70, 164–173. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.1556-6676.1991.tb01579.x.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Casserly, C., Fitzsimmons, G., & Macnab, D. (1995). The Canadian study of life roles and values. In D. E. Super & B. Šverko (Eds.), Life roles, values, and careers: International findings of the work importance study (pp. 117–127). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Chow, A., Galambos, N. L., & Krahn, H. J. (2017). Work values during the transition to adulthood and mid-life satisfaction: Cascading effects across 25 years. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 41, 105–114. https://doi.org/10.1177/0165025415608518.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Coetsier, P., & Claes, R. (1990). Belang van levensrollen en waarden [Salience of life roles and values]. Oostende: Infoservice.

    Google Scholar 

  • Coetsier, P., & Claes, R. (1995). The Flemish work importance study. In D. E. Super & B. Šverko (Eds.), Life roles, values, and careers: International findings of the work importance study (pp. 100–116). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Colozzi, E. A. (2003). Depth-oriented values extraction – effective techniques. Career Development Quarterly, 52(2), 180–189.

    Google Scholar 

  • Consiglio, C., Cenciotti, R., Borgogni, L., Alessandri, G., & Schwartz, S. H. (2016). The WVal: A new measure of work values. Journal of Carreer Assessment, 22, 1–18. https://doi.org/10.1177/1069072716639691.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Crace, R. K., & Brown, D. (2002a). Life values inventory: A values assessment guide for successful living. Williamsburg: Applied Psychological Resources.

    Google Scholar 

  • Crace, R. K., & Brown, D. (2002b). Life values inventory: Understanding your values. Williamsburg: Applied Psychological Resources.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dawis, R. V. (1991). Vocational interests, values, and preferences. In M. D. Dunnette & L. M. Hough (Eds.), Handbook of industrial and organizational psychology: Vol. 2 (2nd ed., pp. 833–871). Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dawis, R. V. (1996). The theory of work adjustment and person-environment-correspondence counseling. In D. Brown, L. Brooks, et al. (Eds.), Career choice and development: Applying contemporary theories to practice (3rd ed., pp. 75–120). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dawis, R. V. (2005). The Minnesota theory of work adjustment. In S. D. Brown & R. W. Lent (Eds.), Career development and counseling: Putting theory and research to work (pp. 3–23). New York: Wiley.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dawis, R. V., & Lofquist, L. H. (1984). A psychological theory of work adjustment. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Doering, M., Rhodes, S. R., & Kaspin, J. (1988). Factor structure comparison of occupational needs and reinforcers. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 32(2), 127–138. https://doi.org/10.1016/0001-8791(88)90010-3.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Dolan, C. V., Oort, F. J., Stoel, R. D., & Wicherts, J. M. (2009). Testing measurement invariance in the target rotated multigroup exploratory factor model. Structural Equation Modeling: A Multidisciplinary Journal, 16, 295–314. https://doi.org/10.1080/10705510902751416.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Dubin, R. (1956). Industrial workers’ worlds: A study of the “central life interests” of industrial workers. Social Problem, 3, 131–142.

    Google Scholar 

  • Elizur, D. (1984). Facets of work values: A structural analysis of work outcomes. Journal of Applied Psychology, 69(3), 379–389. https://doi.org/10.1037/0021-9010.69.3.379.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Elizur, D., & Sagie, A. (1999). Facets of personal values: A structural analysis of life and work values. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 48, 73–89. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-0597.1999.tb00049.x.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Elizur, D., Borg, I., Hunt, R., & Beck, I. M. (1991). The structure of work values: A cross cultural comparison. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 12, 21–38. https://doi.org/10.1002/job.4030120103.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Feather, N. T. (1982). Reasons for entering medical school in relation to value priorities and sex of student. Journal of Occupational Psychology, 55, 119–128. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2044-8325.1982.tb00084.x.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Fitzgerald, L. F., & Betz, N. E. (1994). Career development in cultural context: The role of gender, race, class, and sexual orientation. In M. L. Savickas & K. W. Lent (Eds.), Convergence in career development theories: Implications for science and practice (pp. 103–117). Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Fitzsimmons, G. W., Macnab, D., & Casserly, C. (1986). Technical manual for the life roles inventory: Values and salience. Edmonton: PsiCan Consulting.

    Google Scholar 

  • Greenhaus, J. H. (1973). A factorial investigation of career salience. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 3, 95–98. https://doi.org/10.1016/0001-8791(73)90050-X.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hartung, P. J. (2002). Cultural context in career theory and practice: Role salience and values. Career Development Quarterly, 51, 12–25. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.2161-0045.2002.tb00588.x.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hartung, P. J. (2006). Values. In J. Greenhaus & G. Callanan (Eds.), Encyclopedia of career development (pp. 843–847). Thousand Oaks: Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  • Holland, J. L. (1997). Making vocational choices: A theory of vocational personalities and work environments (3rd ed.). Odessa: Psychological Assessment Resources.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kantamneni, N., & Fouad, N. A. (2014). Qualitative approaches to studying cultural values. In M. Pope, L. Y. Flores, & P. J. Rottinghaus (Eds.), The role of values in careers (pp. 87–99). Charlotte: IAP Information Age Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Karpatschof, B., & Elkjær, H. K. (2000). Yet the bumblebee flies: The reliability of ipsative scores – examined by empirical data and a simulation study. Research report. Copenhagen: Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen.

    Google Scholar 

  • Katz, M. R. (1993). Computer-assisted career decision making: The guide in the machine. Hillsdale: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

    Google Scholar 

  • Katz, D., & Kahn, R. L. (1966). The social psychology of organizations. New York: Wiley.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kerka, S. (2003). Career development of diverse populations (Eric Digest, No. 249). Columbus: ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult, Career, and Vocational Education. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED482536).

    Google Scholar 

  • Kluckhohn, C. (1951). Values and value-orientations in the theory of action. In T. Parsons & E. Shils (Eds.), Toward a general theory of action (pp. 388–433). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kopelman, R. E., Rovenpor, J. L., & Guan, M. (2003). The study of values: Construction of the fourth edition. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 62, 203–220. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0001-8791(02)00047-7.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Krosnick, J. A., & Alwin, D. F. (1988). A test of the form-resistant correlation hypothesis: Ratings, rankings, and the measurement of values. Public Opinion Quarterly, 52(4), 526–538. https://doi.org/10.1086/269128.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Langley, R. (1990). The life role inventory (LRI): Manual. Pretoria: Human Sciences Research Council.

    Google Scholar 

  • Langley, R. (1995). The South African work importance study. In D. E. Super & B. Šverko (Eds.), Life roles, values, and careers: International findings of the work importance study (pp. 188–203). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Google Scholar 

  • Langley, R., du Toit, R., & Herbst, D. L. (1992). Manual for the values scale. Pretoria: Human Sciences Research Council.

    Google Scholar 

  • Leong, F. T. L. (Ed.). (1995). Career development and vocational behavior of racial and ethnic minorities. Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

    Google Scholar 

  • Leung, A. S. (1995). Career development and counseling: A multicultural perspective. In J. Ponterotto, J. M. Casas, L. A. Suzuki, & C. M. Alexander (Eds.), Handbook of multicultural counseling (pp. 549–566). Thousand Oaks: Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  • Leuty, M. E., & Hansen, J. I. C. (2012). Building evidence of validity: The relation between work values, interests, personality, and personal values. Journal of Career Assessment, 21, 175–189. https://doi.org/10.1177/1069072712466714.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Linton, R. (1936). The study of man. New York: Appleton-Century.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lodahl, T. M., & Kejner, M. (1965). The definition and measurement of job involvement. Journal of Applied Psychology, 49, 24–33. https://doi.org/10.1037/h0021692.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lofquist, J. H., & Dawis, R. V. (1978). Values as second-order needs in the theory of work adjustment. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 12, 12–19. https://doi.org/10.1016/0001-8791(78)90003-9.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lokan, J. (1989). Value attainment perceptions in work and leisure. Paper presented at the Australian Association for Research in Education Annual Conference, Adelaide.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lyons, S., Higgins, C., & Duxbury, L. (2010). Work values: Development of a new three-dimensional structure based on confirmatory smallest space analysis. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 31, 969–1002. https://doi.org/10.1002/job.658.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Maio, G. R., & Olson, J. M. (1998). Values as truisms: Evidence and implications. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 74, 294–311. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.74.2.294.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Maio, G. R., Roese, N. J., Seligman, C., & Katz, A. (1996). Rankings, ratings, and the measurement of values: Evidence for the superior validity of ratings. Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 18(2), 171–181. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15324834basp1802_4.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • McCarty, J. A., & Shrum, L. J. (2000). The measurement of personal values in survey research: A test of alternative rating procedures. Public Opinion Quarterly, 24, 271–298. https://doi.org/10.1086/317989.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Mead, G. H. (1934). Mind, self, and society. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Meglino, B. M., & Ravlin, E. C. (1998). Individual values in organizations: Concepts, controversies, and research. Journal of Management, 24(3), 351–389. https://doi.org/10.1177/014920639802400304.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Meredith, W. (1993). Measurement invariance, factor analysis and factorial invariance. Psychometrika, 58, 525–543. https://doi.org/10.1007/bf02294825.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Mumford, M. D., Connelly, M. S., Helton, W. B., Van Doorn, J. R., & Osburn, H. K. (2002). Alternative approaches for measuring values: Direct and indirect assessments in performance prediction. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 61, 348–373. https://doi.org/10.1006/jvbe.2001.1860.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Nevill, D. D., & Super, D. E. (1986a). The values scale: Theory, application, and research (manual). Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nevill, D. D., & Super, D. E. (1986b). The salience inventory: Theory, application, and research (manual). Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Nevill, D. D., & Super, D. E. (1989). Manual to the values scale. Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologist Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Newcomb, T. M. (1950). Social psychology. New York: Dryden.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ng, S. H. (1982). Choosing between ranking and rating procedures for the comparison of values across cultures. European Journal of Social Psychology, 12, 169–172. https://doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2420120204.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Oishi, S., Schimmack, U., Diener, E., & Suh, F. M. (1998). The measurement of values and individualism-collectivism. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 24(11), 1177–1189. https://doi.org/10.1177/01461672982411005.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Oishi, S., Hahn, J., Schimmack, U., Radhakrishan, P., Dzokoto, V., & Ahadi, S. (2005). The measurement of values across cultures: A pairwise comparison approach. Journal of Research in Personality, 39, 299–305. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jrp.2004.08.001.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Parsons, T. (1951). The social system. New York: Free Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Patton, W. (2015). Foreword. In M. McMahon & M. Watson (Eds.), Career assessment: Qualitative approaches. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Peng, K., Nisbett, R. E., & Wong, N. Y. C. (1997). Validity problems comparing values across cultures and possible solutions. Psychological Methods, 2, 351–389.

    Google Scholar 

  • Perera, H. N., McIlveen, P., Burton, L. J., & Corser, D. M. (2015). Beyond congruence measures for the evaluation of personality factor structure replicability: An exploratory structural equation modeling approach. Personality and Individual Differences, 84, 23–29. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2015.01.004.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Pryor, R. (1981). Tracing the development of the work aspect preference scale. Australian Psychologist, 1(2), 1981. https://doi.org/10.1080/00050068108255898.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Pryor, R. G. L. (1983). Work aspect preference scale. Hawthorn: Australian Council for Educational Research.

    Google Scholar 

  • Pryor, R. G. L. (1999). Work aspect preference scale (2nd ed.). Sydney: Congruence Pty Ltd..

    Google Scholar 

  • Rankin, W. L., & Grube, J. W. (1980). A comparison of the ranking and rating procedure for value system measurement. European Journal of Social Psychology, 10, 233–246. https://doi.org/10.1002/ejsp.2420100303.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ritov, I., & Baron, J. (1999). Protected values and omission bias. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 79(2), 79–94. https://doi.org/10.1006/obhd.1999.2839.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Roe, R. A., & Ester, P. (1999). Values and work: Empirical findings and theoretical perspective. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 48(1), 1–21. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-0597.1999.tb00046.x.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Rokeach, M. (1968). Beliefs, attitudes, and values: A theory of organization and change. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rokeach, M. (1973). The nature of human values. New York: Free Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ros, M., Schwartz, S. H., & Surkiss, S. (1999). Basic individual values, work values, and meaning of work. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 48, 49–72. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-0597.1999.tb00048.x.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Rosenberg, M. (1957). Occupations and values. Glencoe: Free Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rottinghaus, P. J., & Zytowski, D. G. (2006). Communalities among adolescents’ work values and interests. Measurement and Evaluation in Counseling and Development, 38, 211–221.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rounds, J. B. (1990). The comparative and combined utility of work value and interest data in career counseling with adults. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 37, 32–45. https://doi.org/10.1016/0001-8791(90)90005-M.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Rounds, J. B., & Armstrong, P. I. (2014). Integrating values and interests for career counseling. In M. Pope, L. Y. Flores, & P. J. Rottinghaus (Eds.), The role of values in careers (pp. 87–99). Charlotte: IAP Information Age Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rounds, J., & Jin, J. (2013). Nature, importance, and assessment of needs and values. In S. D. Brown & R. W. Lent (Eds.), Career development and counseling: Putting theory and research to work (2nd ed., pp. 417–448). Hoboken: Wiley.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rounds, J. B., Henly, G. A., Dawis, R. V., Lofquist, L. H., & Weiss, D. J. (1981). Manual for the Minnesota Importance Questionnaire: A measure of needs and values. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Department of Psychology.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rounds, J. B., Dawis, R. V., & Lofquist, L. H. (1987). Measurement of person-environment fit and prediction of satisfaction in the theory of work adjustment. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 31, 297–318. https://doi.org/10.1016/0001-8791(87)90045-5.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sagiv, L. (2002). Vocational interests and basic values. Journal of Career Assessment, 10(2), 233–257. https://doi.org/10.1177/1069072702010002007.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Salomone, P. R., & Muthard, J. E. (1972). Canonical correlation of vocational needs and vocational style. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 2(2), 163–171. https://doi.org/10.1016/0001-8791(72)90047-4.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sampson, J. P., Jr., Peterson, G. W., Osborn, D. S., & Hayden, S. C. W. (2015). Using career theory to integrate qualitative and quantitative career assessment. In M. McMahon & M. Watson (Eds.), Career assessment: Qualitative approaches (pp. 181–190). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Savickas, M. L. (2014). Work values: A career construction elaboration. In M. Pope, L. Y. Flores, & P. J. Rottinghaus (Eds.), The role of values in careers (pp. 87–99). Charlotte: IAP Information Age Publishing.

    Google Scholar 

  • Savickas, M. L. (2015). Life-design counseling manual. Kent, OH: Author.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schwartz, S. H. (1992). Universals in the content and structure of values: Theoretical advances and empirical tests in 20 countries. Advances in Experimental Social Psychology, 25, 1–65. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0065-2601(08)60281-6.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Schwartz, S. H. (1994). Are there universal aspects in the structure and contents of human values? Journal of Social Issues, 50, 19–45. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1540-4560.1994.tb01196.x.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Schwartz, S. H. (1996). Value priorities and behavior: Applying a theory of integrated value systems. In C. Seligman, J. M. Olson, & M. P. Zanna (Eds.), The psychology of values: The Ontario symposium (Vol. 8, pp. 1–24). Hillsdale: Erlbaum.

    Google Scholar 

  • Schwartz, S. H. (1999). A theory of cultural values and some implications for work. Applied Psychology: An International Review, 48, 23–49. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-0597.1999.tb00047.x.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Schwartz, S. H. (2012). An overview of the Schwartz theory of basic values. Online Readings in Psychology and Culture, 2(1). https://doi.org/10.9707/2307-0919.1116.

  • Schwartz, S. H., & Bilsky, W. (1987). Toward a universal psychological structure of human values. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 53, 550–562. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.53.3.550.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Schwartz, S. H., & Bilsky, W. (1990). Toward a theory of the universal content and structure of values, extension and cross-cultural replications. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 58(5), 878–891. https://doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.58.5.878.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Simpson, R. L., & Simpson, I. H. (1960). Values, personal influence, and occupational choice. Social Forces, 39, 116–125. https://doi.org/10.2307/2574149.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sodano, S. M. (2011). Integrating work and basic values into the spherical model of interests. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 78, 1–10. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvb.2010.09.004.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Spokane, A. R., Meir, I. E., & Catalano, M. (2000). Person-environment congruence and Hollands theory: A review and reconsideration. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 57, 147–179. https://doi.org/10.1006/jvbe.2000.1771.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Spranger, E. (1928). Types of men. New York: Stechert-Hafner.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stone, C. H. (1933). The personality factor in vocational guidance. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 28, 274–275.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stulman, D. A., & Dawis, R. V. (1976). Experimental validation of two MIQ scales. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 9(2), 161–167. https://doi.org/10.1016/0001-8791(76)90074-9.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sung, Y. T., Chang, Y. T. Y., Cheng, T. Y., & Tien, H. L. S. (2017). Development and validation of a work values scale for assessing high school students: A mixed methods approach. European Journal of Psychological Assessment. https://doi.org/10.1027/1015-5759/a000408.

    Google Scholar 

  • Super, D. E. (1957). The psychology of careers. New York: Harper & Row.

    Google Scholar 

  • Super, D. E. (1962). The structure of work values in relation to status, achievement, interests, and adjustment. Journal of Applied Psychology, 46, 231–239. https://doi.org/10.1037/h0040109.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Super, D. E. (1970). The work values inventory. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

    Google Scholar 

  • Super, D. E. (1973). The work values inventory. In D. G. Zytowski (Ed.), New approaches to interest measurement (pp. 189–205). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Super, D. E. (1980). A life-span, life-space approach to career development. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 16, 282–298. https://doi.org/10.1016/0001-8791(80)90056-1.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Super, D. E. (1981). The relative importance of work. Bulletin International Association of Educational and Vocational Guidance, 37, 26–36.

    Google Scholar 

  • Super, D. E. (1990). A life-span, life-space approach to career development. In D. Brown, L. Brooks, et al. (Eds.), Career choice and development: Applying contemporary theories to practice (2nd ed., pp. 197–261). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Super, D. E. (1995). Values: Their nature, assessment, and practical use. In D. E. Super & B. Šverko (Eds.), Life roles, values, and careers: International findings of the work importance study (pp. 54–61). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Google Scholar 

  • Super, D. E., & Bohn, M. J., Jr. (1970). Occupational psychology. Belmont: Wadsworth.

    Google Scholar 

  • Super, D. E., & Šverko, B. (Eds.). (1995). Life roles, values, and careers: International findings of the work importance study. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Super, D. E., Crites, J. O., Hummel, R. C., Moser, H. P., Overstreet, P. L., & Warnath, C. F. (1957). Vocational development: A framework for research. New York: Bureau of Publications, Teachers College, Columbia University.

    Google Scholar 

  • Super, D. E., Savickas, M. L., & Super, C. M. (1996). The life-span, life-space approach to careers. In D. Brown, L. Brooks, et al. (Eds.), Career choice and development: Applying contemporary theories to practice (3rd ed., pp. 121–178). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Super, D. E., Osborne, W. L., Walsh, D. J., Brown, S. D., & Niles, S. G. (2001). Developmental career assessment and counseling: The C-DAC model. Journal of Counseling and Development, 71, 74–82. https://doi.org/10.1002/j.1556-6676.1992.tb02175.x.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Šverko, B. (1984). Važnost rada u životu pojedinca: Prilog evaluaciji jednog kognitivnog modela [Importance of work in the life of an individual: Contribution to evaluation of a cognitive model]. Psihologija, 17(3), 48–60.

    Google Scholar 

  • Šverko, B. (1987). The structure of work values: A cross-national comparison. Acta Instituti Psychologici Universitatis Zagrabiensis, 17, 23–29.

    Google Scholar 

  • Šverko, B. (1989). Origin of individual differences in importance attached to work: A model and a contribution to its evaluation. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 34, 28–39. https://doi.org/10.1016/0001-8791(89)90062-6.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Šverko, B. (1995). The structure and hierarchy of values viewed cross-nationally. In D. E. Super & B. Šverko (Eds.), Life roles, values, and careers: International findings of the work importance study (pp. 225–240). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Šverko, B. (2006). Super’s career development theory. In J. Greenhaus & G. Callanan (Eds.), Encyclopedia of career development (pp. 789–792). Thousand Oaks: Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  • Šverko, I., & Babarović, T. (2006). The validity of Holland’s theory in Croatia. Journal of Career Assessment, 14(4), 490–507. https://doi.org/10.1177/1069072706288940.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Šverko, B., & Vizek-Vidović, V. (1995). Studies of the meaning of work: Approaches, models, and some of the findings. In D. E. Super & B. Šverko (Eds.), Life roles, values, and careers: International findings of the work importance study (pp. 3–21). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Šverko, B., Jerneić, Z., Kulenović, A., & Vizek-Vidović, V. (1987). Work values of students preparing for different occupations: A contribution to validation of the VIS Values Scale. Revija za Psihologiju, 17(1–2), 59–66.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thompson, B., Levitov, J. E., & Miederhoff, P. A. (1982). Validity of the Rokeach value survey. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 42, 899–905. https://doi.org/10.1177/001316448204200325.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Transberg, M., Slane, S., & Ekeberg, S. E. (1993). The relationship between interest congruence and satisfaction: A meta-analysis. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 42, 253–264. https://doi.org/10.1006/jvbe.1993.1018.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Trentini, G. (1995). Life roles and values in Italy: Some results of the work importance study. In D. E. Super & B. Šverko (Eds.), Life roles, values, and careers: International findings of the work importance study (pp. 160–169). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

    Google Scholar 

  • Triandis, H. C. (1994). Culture and social behavior. New York: McGraw-Hill.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tsabari, O., Tziner, A., & Meir, I. (2005). Updated meta-analysis on the relationship between congruence and satisfaction. Journal of Career Assessment, 13(2), 216–232. https://doi.org/10.1177/1069072704273165.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Twenge, J. M., Campbell, S. M., Hoffman, B. J., & Lance, E. L. (2010). Generational differences in work values: Leisure and extrinsic values increasing, social and intrinsic values decreasing. Journal of Management, 36, 1117–1142. https://doi.org/10.1177/0149206309352246.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Vernon, P. E., & Allport, G. W. (1931). The test of personal values. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 26, 231–248.

    Google Scholar 

  • Watson, M. (2017). Bridging quantitative and qualitative career assessment: The integrative structured interview process. In M. McMahon (Ed.), Career counselling: Constructivist approaches (2nd ed., pp. 260–269). London: Routledge.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wehrly, B., Kenney, K. R., & Kenney, M. E. (1999). Counseling multiracial families. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  • Whiston, S. C., Li, Y., Goodrich Mitts, N., & Wright, L. (2017). Effectiveness of career choice interventions: A meta-analytic replication and extension. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 100, 175–184. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvb.2017.03.010.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Wils, T., Saba, T., Waxin, M. F., & Labelle, C. (2011). Intergenerational and intercultural differences in work values in Quebec and the United Arab Emirates. Industrial Relations, 66, 445–469. https://doi.org/10.7202/1006347ar.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Branimir Šverko .

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2019 Springer Nature Switzerland AG

About this chapter

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this chapter

Šverko, B., Babarović, T., Šverko, I. (2019). Values and Life Role Salience and Their Assessment in Career Counselling. In: Athanasou, J., Perera, H. (eds) International Handbook of Career Guidance . Springer, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-25153-6_32

Download citation

  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-25153-6_32

  • Published:

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Cham

  • Print ISBN: 978-3-030-25152-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-3-030-25153-6

  • eBook Packages: EducationEducation (R0)