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Surgical and Non-surgical Treatment of Strabismus

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Abstract

There exist both non-surgical and surgical methods of treatment of strabismus. The former includes the use of occlusion, prisms and exercises. The surgical principles of strabismus correction are the weakening (recession, myotomy) or strengthening (resection, plication, tuck) of extraocular muscles. Muscles may also be transposed to provide movement in a field of complete paralysis, subjected to a retroequatorial myopexy to limit movement in the field of action of the muscle. This chapter describes these and other techniques along with specific indications of their use.

Keywords

Recession Resection Myectomy Myopexy Toxin Tuck 

Supplementary material

Video 12.3

Video depicting the use of fornix incision to approach the MR and LR with an explanation of the advantages (MOV 16349 kb)

Video 12.4

The use of a hang back adjustable suture on a bow tie while carrying out a LR recession (MOV 17774 kb)

Video 12.11

A 47 year old lady with left hypotropia, pseudoptosis and pseudoproptosis secondary to myopia. On a cover test in primary gaze with her myopic glasses o, she has a left small angle esotropia and left hyptropia. There is limitation of left elevation, most prominent in dextroelevation (MOV 73221 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Royal Free London NHS Foundation TrustLondonUK

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