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Sonic Virtuality, Environment, and Presence

  • Mark Grimshaw-AagaardEmail author
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Part of the Numanities - Arts and Humanities in Progress book series (NAHP, volume 11)

Abstract

The article presents a brief introduction to the concept of sonic virtuality, a view of sound as a multi-modal, emergent perception that provides a framework that has since been used to provide an explanation of the formation of environments. Additionally, the article uses such concepts to explain the phenomenon of presence, not only in virtual worlds but also in actual worlds. The view put forward is that environment is an emergent perception, formed from the hypothetical modelling of salient worlds of sensory things, and it is in the environment that we feel present. The article ends with some thoughts on the use of biofeedback in computer games as part of the immersive technology designed to facilitate presence in such worlds.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Aalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark

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