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An Intelligent-Agent Facilitated Scaffold for Fostering Reflection in a Team-Based Project Course

  • Sreecharan SankaranarayananEmail author
  • Xu Wang
  • Cameron Dashti
  • Marshall An
  • Clarence Ngoh
  • Michael Hilton
  • Majd Sakr
  • Carolyn Rosé
Conference paper
  • 1.1k Downloads
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11626)

Abstract

This paper reports on work adapting an industry standard team practice referred to as Mob Programming into a paradigm called Online Mob Programming (OMP) for the purpose of encouraging teams to reflect on concepts and share work in the midst of their project experience. We present a study situated within a series of three course projects in a large online course on Cloud Computing. In a \(3\times 3\) Latin Square design, we compare students working alone and in two OMP configurations (with and without transactivity-maximization team formation designed to enhance reflection). The analysis reveals the extent to which grading on the produced software rewards teams where highly skilled individuals dominate the work. Further, compliance with the OMP paradigm is associated with greater evidence of group reflection on concepts and greater shared practice of programming.

Keywords

Online Mob Programming Project-based learning Computer-supported collaborative learning Conversational agents 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sreecharan Sankaranarayanan
    • 1
    Email author
  • Xu Wang
    • 1
  • Cameron Dashti
    • 1
  • Marshall An
    • 1
  • Clarence Ngoh
    • 1
  • Michael Hilton
    • 1
  • Majd Sakr
    • 1
  • Carolyn Rosé
    • 1
  1. 1.Carnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA

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