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Introduction: In Lesbian Worlds

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Abstract

It has taken me time to arrive at trauma. I have been hovering around it for more than a decade, ever since I thought, perhaps somewhat naively, that sociology could help me to make sense of the way in which our lives got caught in a bewildering swirl of war and destruction. And although people say that trauma is a staple feature of our epoch, that we live in “trauma culture” (Kaplan 2005), this does not make my own less painful. Its capacity to occasionally overwhelm me at unbearable levels is not diminished—but often amplified—by the images of misery that inundate us on a daily basis. While trauma has pervaded the pages that I have written, I did not have the courage or the means for putting my finger on it—it has for long remained a stowaway in my texts, an invisible co-traveller waiting to be drawn to the surface, identified, named. It is only through years of psychotherapy and therapeutic feminist scholarship that I have now managed to take a better look at it, to approach it and touch it, and, to a certain extent, harness its colossal affective force. I could thus become more aware of how it colours numerous aspects of my existence serving as a thread that runs through generations of my ancestors and connects me—in still insufficiently recognised ways—with many of my contemporaries, extended family members and (former) conationals.

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© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Instituto de Ciências SociaisUniversidade de LisboaLisbonPortugal

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