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Interventions to Improve Cognitive Functioning After Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

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Abstract

Traumatic injury to the brain can affect the core of what makes us human—our cognition and emotion. The injuries are acute but may result in chronic burdens for individuals and families as well as society. Effective approaches to improving functioning are needed, and the benefits may be far-reaching. We discuss some basic principles to guide current practice, as well as directions for continuing advancement of ways to improve functioning after injury. Interventions are more likely to be effective when we take into account multiple levels of brain functioning, from neurons to pharmacological systems to social networks. Significant benefits can be gained by addressing important modulators of functioning. The potential to improve cognitive functioning via training is of special importance, and benefits may synergize with pharmacologic and other approaches. The combination of physical and experiential trauma deserves special consideration, with effects on cognition, emotion, and other substrates of behavior. Directing further research toward key frontiers that bridge neuroscience and rehabilitation will advance the development of clinically effective interventions.

Keywords

Traumatic brain injury Rehabilitation Cognitive training Cognitive neuroscience Frontal lobes Attention Memory Executive control 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Special thanks to Mark D’Esposito, Nicholas Rodriguez, Deborah Binder, and Erica Pool for their support.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.VA Northern California, Department of NeurologyMartinezUSA
  2. 2.Department of Neurology, University of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA
  3. 3.San Francisco VA HCS, Mental Health ServiceSan FranciscoUSA
  4. 4.University of California, San Francisco, Department of PsychiatrySan FranciscoUSA

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