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Situation Calculus Meets Description Logics

  • Jens ClaßenEmail author
  • Gerhard Lakemeyer
  • Benjamin Zarrieß
Chapter
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11560)

Abstract

For more than six years, the groups of Franz Baader and Gerhard Lakemeyer have collaborated in the area of decidable verification of Golog programs. Golog is an action programming language, whose semantics is based on the Situation Calculus, a variant of full first-order logic. In order to achieve decidability, the expressiveness of the base logic had to be restricted, and using a Description Logic was a natural choice. In this chapter, we highlight some of the main results and insights obtained during our collaboration.

Keywords

Situation Calculus Description Logics Verification 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG), research unit FOR 1513 on Hybrid Reasoning for Intelligent Systems, project A1.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jens Claßen
    • 1
    Email author
  • Gerhard Lakemeyer
    • 2
  • Benjamin Zarrieß
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Computing ScienceSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  2. 2.Knowledge-Based Systems GroupRWTH Aachen UniversityAachenGermany
  3. 3.Institute of Theoretical Computer ScienceTechnische Universität DresdenDresdenGermany

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