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Interactive System for Collaborative Historical Analogy

  • Ryo YoshikawaEmail author
  • Ryohei Ikejiri
  • Yasunobu Sumikawa
Conference paper
  • 664 Downloads
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 11591)

Abstract

Supporting learning history has become an important topic in education research. To discuss social issues using historical analogy, group learning composed of two pairs is effective. In this paper, we propose a novel interactive system for collaborative historical analogy. This system first provides news articles to users from our database. Then, it uses a clustering algorithm that makes groups from what the users assign event categories for news articles. After assessing the result of the clustering algorithm, our system provides two functions for promoting collaborative learning: discussion spaces and archiving the discussions. The results of quantitative and qualitative evaluation show that our system have the potential to enhance group discussion and collaborative historical analogy in class.

Keywords

Collaborative learning History education Analogy Grouping 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 16K16314.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ryo Yoshikawa
    • 1
    Email author
  • Ryohei Ikejiri
    • 2
  • Yasunobu Sumikawa
    • 3
  1. 1.Faculty of Information and Media StudiesNagoya Bunri UniversityInazawaJapan
  2. 2.Interfaculty Initiative in Information StudiesThe University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  3. 3.University Education Center, Tokyo Metropolitan UniversityHachiojiJapan

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