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Lady Destroyers

  • Penelope JacksonEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the deliberate act of destroying art (as opposed to vandalising art). Women have been motivated to destroy art for a variety of reasons that include monetary gain (Violet Organ and Lucie Bayard), loyalty to an artist husband (Jacqueline Bullmore), preserving the image of a statesman husband in his prime (Clementine Churchill), and the alleged destruction of art for research purposes (Patricia Cornwell).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.TaurangaNew Zealand

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