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Welders’ Knowledge of Personal Protective Equipment Usage and Occupational Hazards Awareness in the Ghanaian Informal Auto-mechanic Industrial Sector

  • Mohammed-Aminu SandaEmail author
  • Juliet Nugble
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 969)

Abstract

This study explored the knowledge of informal auto-mechanics welders on personal protective equipment (PPE) usage, and their levels of occupational hazards awareness associated with the welding activity. Guided by OSHA’s 2014 Hazards Assessment Checklist, and interviews, data was collected from three auto-mechanic shops engaged in welding activities in Volta Region of Ghana. Based on the analysis, it is established that the informal auto-mechanic welders generally lack knowledge on significant PPE requirement associated with the welding activities. they also lack awareness of occupational hazards associated with physical elements of the welding activities, even though they showed semblance of awareness in relation to others that are chemical-oriented. It is concluded that though the informal auto-mechanics engaged in welding activities have the requisite expertise and skills to perform their tasks, their knowledge of PPE usage and their awareness levels of occupational hazards associated with the welding activities seemed to be generally constrained.

Keywords

Welders Welding activity Personal protective equipment Occupational hazards awareness Auto-mechanic shop Informal industrial sector Ghana 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Ghana Business SchoolAccraGhana
  2. 2.Luleå University of TechnologyLuleåSweden

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