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Cultural and Diversity Issues in Mediation and Negotiation

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Part of the Current Clinical Psychiatry book series (CCPSY)

Abstract

Mental health professionals often engage in professional work that resembles mediation and negotiation. Whether in the form of couples counseling, family therapy, parent–child counseling, or simply the setting of boundaries and ground rules in individual psychotherapy, mental health practice has much in common with the work that mediators do. In this chapter, we offer the perspectives of two practicing mediators on a subject that is critical to the work of both mediators and mental health professionals—namely, cultural and diversity issues.

Keywords

  • Mediation
  • Bias
  • Oppression
  • Discrimination
  • Internalized oppression
  • Confounding variables

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Hoffman, D.A., Triantafillou, K. (2019). Cultural and Diversity Issues in Mediation and Negotiation. In: Parekh, R., Trinh, NH. (eds) The Massachusetts General Hospital Textbook on Diversity and Cultural Sensitivity in Mental Health. Current Clinical Psychiatry. Humana, Cham. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-20174-6_3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-20174-6_3

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